Upgrading to 1 1/4" Main Line

Help Support Plumbing Forums:

FishScreener

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2018
Messages
523
Reaction score
180
Location
83467
Having had four daughters and their mother in the house: If there had been five showers, every one of them would have run for at least half an hour every morning.

The two boys had enough sense to schedule PE as their first class, and shower at school to avoid battling for the two showers.
 

Twowaxhack

Professional
Professional
Joined
Feb 9, 2021
Messages
2,240
Reaction score
849
Location
United states
Having had four daughters and their mother in the house: If there had been five showers, every one of them would have run for at least half an hour every morning.

The two boys had enough sense to schedule PE as their first class, and shower at school to avoid battling for the two showers.
That would come to 12.5 gpm. No problem.

You would need an adequate supply of hot water and be able to deliver it all at once.
 

JG plumbing

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2021
Messages
614
Reaction score
153
Location
Iowa
After 300 ft of pipe and climbing 20 feet and while the lawn is being watered and a load of laundry being run. I hope no one has to poop. There might be a clog.
 

Jordan Duff

Active Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2018
Messages
26
Reaction score
1
Location
Kansas
I went out yesterday to mark where the addition will go so I could begin marking the new water main to be trenched. I talked to my dad about the project and he asked if I was sure the line was galvanized. I’d assumed it was because it’s 3/4” galvanized where it enters my basement. But he pointed out that may have been done just so it was sturdy at that location.

We are planning to dig up a bury hydrant today (that I plan to do away with) to see what the size and type of line the main currently is.

So - if it’s currently 1” PVC, I think that’s as big or bigger than 1.25” pex? If that’s the case, I may leave all of the 1” PVC in place and just extend it out with more PVC for the hydrants.

The downside would be that we would be adding on over some aged PVC, and I’m not sure how long it should last? I don’t know how deep footers go, but I guess as long as they don’t go over 3’ down (encasing water line) the line should be replaceable some day?

The upside would be I could avoid my two options of laying a new line: 1. Going under where the addition will be, putting the line inside a bigger PVC. 2. Going north of where the addition will be (so the line is more easily accessed for repairs if need be), which would involve trenching through A LOT of tree roots.

Either way I plan to use PVC at this point, after seeing how much cheaper it is than pex.

What are your guys’ thoughts? Is 1” PVC enough for what I’m wanting (since ID is bigger than 1” pex ID) or should I upgrade it to 1.25” PVC? I’m guessing if it’s anything less than 1” PVC I should replace it all? Is going under the addition (through a “sleeve”) a big deal? Is that worth trenching through a ton of roots to avoid?
 

JG plumbing

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2021
Messages
614
Reaction score
153
Location
Iowa
Since I'm not an engineer I use the upc tables to determine pipe size.

My opinion is you should go through and add up all of the fixtures and piping and take the elevation into account. Then use the table.

I would go by that.
 

Jordan Duff

Active Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2018
Messages
26
Reaction score
1
Location
Kansas
Since I'm not an engineer I use the upc tables to determine pipe size.

My opinion is you should go through and add up all of the fixtures and piping and take the elevation into account. Then use the table.

I would go by that.
What about going under the addition in a “sleeve” or going around the addition through tree roots?
 

JG plumbing

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2021
Messages
614
Reaction score
153
Location
Iowa
If you have a feasible plan where you could pull it back out of the sleeve, and feed new back in through it, I don't see a problem. I've done something similar with pex. The 90 bend to go up through the slab was an electrical conduit with a really long bend.

The tree root route I guess would depend on how hard it'll be in reality. Sometimes you think things will be hard and they don't end up being that way.

I think if it were me (and I'm not there in person to get a good feel for what you have going on) I would battle the roots.
 

Twowaxhack

Professional
Professional
Joined
Feb 9, 2021
Messages
2,240
Reaction score
849
Location
United states
I’m a little slow today and not sure I’m following. I think you’re saying it’s NOT ok to build a structure over a water line?
Not a pvc water line , unless it was sleeved through another pipe and did not terminate within the foundation walls.
 
Last edited:

frodo

Just call me Macgyver
Professional
Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2014
Messages
8,537
Reaction score
2,926
Location
right here right now, over there later on.
PVC is effected by sunlight UV rays
it turns the pipe brittle, That is the reason the code forbids the use of pvc within 5' of the foundation wall

Your best bet, or rather economy wise, run pvc up to the house
then transition to pex using a ball valve under the flower bed
install a plastic valve box

from the internet
1'' pvc Id 1.049
11/4'' pvc id 1.380
1'' pex ID .875
1 1/4 pex id 1.054
 

Twowaxhack

Professional
Professional
Joined
Feb 9, 2021
Messages
2,240
Reaction score
849
Location
United states
PVC is effected by sunlight UV rays
it turns the pipe brittle, That is the reason the code forbids the use of pvc within 5' of the foundation wall

Your best bet, or rather economy wise, run pvc up to the house
then transition to pex using a ball valve under the flower bed
install a plastic valve box

from the internet
1'' pvc Id 1.049
11/4'' pvc id 1.380
1'' pex ID .875
1 1/4 pex id 1.054
Buried pvc wouldn’t be affected by uv. It can also be painted.

It’s simply not allowed inside the foundation here because it’s not reliable enough.
 

Latest posts

Top