Unusual Tub Drain

Discussion in 'Showers and Tubs' started by stevevh, Feb 6, 2011.

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  1. Feb 6, 2011 #1

    stevevh

    stevevh

    stevevh

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    Hi all,

    Firstly, great forum with lots of good info! I recently started a remodeling project of a bathroom. After removing the walls and the original tub, I started seeking out a new modern tub that could fit the older plumbing. I found one but noticed that all the new tub drains are different from the one currently installed. This is where I hope one of you gurus can help.

    [​IMG]

    In the above picture what is the PVC pipe that is attached to the the top of the brass drain and what is its purpose? I assume it is some kind of vent, as it runs up into the roof, but all the new drains no longer have this! Any info is much appreciated,

    Thanks guys,

    Steve
     
  2. Feb 7, 2011 #2

    SlowDrip

    SlowDrip

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    Can't say that I have ever seen something like this, but it does appear to be a vent of some sort. Very strange.
     
  3. Feb 7, 2011 #3

    Mr_David

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    Do you have an AC unit in the attic? It is probably a condensate drain.
    I have seen this done with an ABS tub waste & overflow with a tee installed just below the overflow fitting. I seem to recall looking it up in the code book and it was an aproved method of connecting a condensate drain.
     
  4. Feb 7, 2011 #4

    havasu

    havasu

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    Isn't that just an old antequated vent line for the tub drain?
     
  5. Feb 8, 2011 #5

    phishfood

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    No, it is located on the wrong side of the trap to be useful as a vent. The overflow would fulfill the same function if that arrangement would work as a vent. My bet is on it being an AC condensate drain.
     
  6. Feb 8, 2011 #6

    havasu

    havasu

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    Oops! I should have engaged my brain before engaging my typing fingers.
     
  7. Feb 8, 2011 #7

    stevevh

    stevevh

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    Thanks for the replies guys! Damn you guys are good!:D I climbed up into the roof and sure enough it is the drain for the AC. So this raises a few more questions. How would you guys tackle this? Is there a way to replace the old drain with a new one and integrate the AC drain into the plumbing? Or can I build a custom drain out of PVC and still be in code?

    Thanks again...
     
  8. Feb 8, 2011 #8

    stevevh

    stevevh

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    Just saw this post...:eek:

    So it looks like I might be able to purchase or build something that might accommodate this setup! Any idea if anyone makes these anymore?
     
  9. Feb 8, 2011 #9

    Mr_David

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    Can you reroute the pvc line to the sink and connect it to the drain with a branched tailpeice below th pop-up assembly?
    You can open the floor more for acces to the drain. It my go directly toward the toilet and connect to toilet drain vent. Depending on what the p-trapand trap arm is made of, you can install an ABS or PVC waste and over flow and install a tee just below the overflow fitting
     
  10. Feb 8, 2011 #10

    stevevh

    stevevh

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    Thanks Mr_David!:)

    I think I am going to replace the whole drain with a PVC type similar to this:

    Westbrass D49421 PVC Twist Close Waste Bath Tub Drain - Fixture Universe

    and then add a T below the overflow fitting as you suggested.
    How sturdy are the PVC fittings as opposed to the metal/brass ones in your opinion?
     
  11. Feb 8, 2011 #11

    havasu

    havasu

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    I personally hate PVC bath drains. I am doing a replacement this weekend where a lady accidentally hit the overflow with her foot and broke off the chrome (plastic) cover. Now I have to cut a 16" x 16" hole in the adjacent room just to get to the drain for her tub. They would be easier for adding the necessary tee that you need.
     
  12. Feb 8, 2011 #12

    SlowDrip

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    I'm glad we don't use PVC pipe up here for interior plumbing.
     
  13. Feb 8, 2011 #13

    phishfood

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    I wouldn't use a bath drain that has a plastic stopper or strainer. But I wouldn't hesitate at all to use a PVC or ABS waste and overflow kit with chromed brass strainer, stopper, and overflow plate.
     
  14. Feb 15, 2011 #14

    CHRISM

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    If I saw the `plastic`pipe that is connected to the Bath Overflow Fitting in the picture - here in the U.K. - I would be looking to confirm that it was an Overflow Pipe from a Cold Water Storage Tank - This often occurs when the CWS Tank is installed in a Cupboard which is adjacent the Bathroom and
    not near an outside wall - or where termination to outside was not possible for other reasons - although obviously `laziness` could also account for this connection.

    In the U.K. / Europe the Bath Overflow & Tank Overflow Fitting is manufactured so that if the Cold Water Storage Tank Overflowed - the Water would `emerge` from the Bath Overflow - into the Bath - NOT down the Bath Overflow Pipe to `Waste` - The Tank Overflowing MUST be `Immediately Visible` - to stop the Wasting of Water - When the Tank Overflowing is seen in the Bath - the `Theory` is that one would rectify the problem `Quickly`.

    IF this is the case when the Questioner - stevevh - installs the `New` Bath Overflow / Condensate Drain Fitting - Apart from it being `Undesireable` to have Condensate running into the Bath while it is being USED - `Running`Condensate WILL `Mark`/ Damage the surface of the Bath !!

    Perhaps the type of Bath Overflow + `Additional` Overflow in the U.S. will NOT `direct` Water from the `Additional` Overflow connection INTO the Bath ??

    I ASSUME that previously the Condensate was NOT `directed` INTO the Bath by the existing Fitting - ??

    I mentioned this because it would be `unfortunate` to have almost completed the `Works` only to find out that the Condensate DID discharge INTO the Bath !!

    I am `guessing` that the notion of a `Dedicated` Bath Overflow Fitting with the facility to connect an Overflow Pipe - manufactured as I described above - - is `Unusual` in U.S. Plumbing - As I noted that it was NOT mentioned as a `Possibility` in the `Answers` - ??

    BELOW IS ADVICE IN CASE YOU DECIDE TO CARRY OUT A DIFFERENT METHOD OF INSTALLING YOUR BATH AND THE CONNECTION OF THE CONDENSATE DRAIN PIPE:

    Further to the advice given by my U.S. Colleagues - If you are `fabricating` pipework into which you will `Tee`
    the Condensate Drain Pipe - Unless the Condensate Container on the AC Unit is `Sealed` or has a `Trap` on it which would prevent `Sewer Gasses`/ Bacteria etc from entering it - WHICH I DOUBT [?] - You MUST ensure that you `Tee` into the Bath Overflow Pipe - NOT - into the Bath Waste Pipe !!

    You must NOT connect into ANY Pipework that has a `Direct Route` to the Drainage System - BECAUSE of the `Sewer Gasses`/ Bacteria etc. - A `TRAP` [Water Seal] MUST be between the Condensate Drain Connection and the `Drainage System` - which STOPS `Sewer Gasses` etc. from entering the Building / AC Unit.


    "Regards", CHRISM.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2011
  15. Feb 15, 2011 #15

    Mr_David

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    Thanks for clarifying that.
    It often occurs that you think you explained something thorough enough, when you see the results, you scratch your head wondering how they ended up with something else.
     
  16. Feb 19, 2011 #16

    CHRISM

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    "Hello MrDavid",

    Thanks for the `Thanks` - I know exactly what you mean - You will be `aware` that My `Posts` are viewed by some people as `Far Too Long` - described once as a `Wall of Text` [ Although I do use paragraphs] - Even so I write so much `Detail` so that I HOPE most people will understand what I have described [?]

    I do TRY to give `additional information`- that either has not been `addressed` - OR on possibilities that may arise whilst carrying out the `Original Task`.

    I do think that sometimes some of our `Colleagues` forget that WE are trying to `Help` people who may not have ANY Plumbing Knowledge/Skills.

    I probably AM `Guilty` of trying to provide `Too Much` Information at the `Early Stages` of an Enquiry - ?? - I certainly am NOT trying to `Pre-empt`
    the other `Plumbers` on here - by giving so much detail.

    "Regards",

    CHRISM.
     
  17. Feb 19, 2011 #17

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    It is understandable when someone without experience in plumbing does such. But when guys that I know have 5+ years in the plumbing field manage to make instructions XYZ into YQBNM, it really frustrates and puzzles me.
     
  18. Feb 19, 2011 #18

    havasu

    havasu

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    What the hell is wrong with YQBNM? I happen to like it that way! :D
     
  19. Feb 20, 2011 #19

    SlowDrip

    SlowDrip

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    Young Quiet Buxom Nubile Maidens are better than XYZ any day. I don't know what phishfood is on about...
     
  20. Feb 20, 2011 #20

    stevevh

    stevevh

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    Hey guys,

    Thanks for all the good info! The more I get the better....
    After doing a little more research and brainstorming a bit, I think that the best and easiest solution is to fit the existing drain to the new bath. It is almost a perfect fit and all I need to do is shorten the bath drain by about an inch.

    The exterior of the drain is in good shape but there is obviously quite a bit of calcium/other funky buildup in the bath-drain/AC vent. If I clean it up do you guys see any issues in re-using the drain?
    Also, what type of time-frame should one replace a brass drain if ever?

    Thanks,

    Steve
     

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