Kitchen Renovation Help

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Chuckman4112, Nov 2, 2012.

  1. Nov 2, 2012 #1

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    Hello all,

    Just looking for some helpful information for my Kithen make-over.

    Information...

    I am planning on moving my sink from a current inside wall to the center of the kitchen. My first level (Kitchen level) of my home is on a 4" slab. My home was built in the late 50's. There is a main drain line under the floor approximately 5 feet over from where the new sink will be. How far down, I'm not quite sure yet. I am guessing that it is at least 10" total or more. Obviously I will need to tie into that for the drain and I will have to run the water lines also. The dish washer will be on the island also, so I am going to need to run electric. I have attached a JPG so you get a better picture of layout.

    Questions...

    1.) Where should I run the water lines and wiring? In the dirt under the slab?
    2.) Is there any special wrapping I should do for the lines?
    3.) I am guessing that a 5' 1-1/2 drain run from island to main drain tie in will have more than enough slope. True?
    4.) Can I run the electric conduit in the same channel as the water pipes?

    Anything you can help with would be appreciated...Thanks

    kitchen.JPG
     
  2. Nov 3, 2012 #2

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    I would run the new drain with 2" pipe. Put a cleanout on the new drain riser just above the floor or inside the cabinet.

    If you can, tie into the existing water lines above the slab so that transition from old to new piping is accessible.

    The wiring needs to be inside of an electrical conduit under the concrete, with as few bends in it as possible.

    Looking at it, I would probably cut two trenches in the floor, one for the drain line, and the other for the water lines and electrical conduit.

    Please note that I am a plumber, not an electrician, and so any electrical advice I might give is unprofessional
     
  3. Nov 3, 2012 #3

    stevemachine

    stevemachine

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    My question is with the island sink how do you plan on venting your drain? You could do an AAV I suppose. Might be the easiest considering its on slab.
     
  4. Nov 3, 2012 #4

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    Thanks Phishfood

    Stevemachine, Looking at my picture where it says "Main Drain line (existing)' Right where the arrow is pointing is where my vent pipe to roof is attached. That's not going to work????
     
  5. Nov 3, 2012 #5

    stevemachine

    stevemachine

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    Ah ok I see, yeah that should work fine then. As long as the drain to vent isn't over 8 ft for 2" pipe your good to go.
     
  6. Nov 4, 2012 #6

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    No, that won't meet code. Even if the riser for the new kitchen drain is within 8 feet of the vented main line, you still will have an Strap. You will have to install an air admittance valve under the sink.
     
  7. Nov 4, 2012 #7

    stevemachine

    stevemachine

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    Ah yes that's true, I see what your saying, because then the fall is way too much and s traps the drain. I had a brain Fart for sure.
     
  8. Nov 4, 2012 #8

    phishfood

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    Some days, my brain IS a fart.
     
  9. Nov 4, 2012 #9

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    Not sure what that is, But I will research it. Thanks
     
  10. Nov 4, 2012 #10

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    Okay, I see what it is and how it is used. Seems easy enough.
     
  11. Nov 4, 2012 #11

    stevemachine

    stevemachine

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    Haha yeah, everyone gets those days too
     
  12. Nov 6, 2012 #12

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    Hey guys, one follow up. The water lines I am running to the center of the kitchen...I plan to run them in the trench I am digging under the concrete. Any special wrapping of the pipes or tips?

    Thanks
     
  13. Nov 6, 2012 #13

    stevemachine

    stevemachine

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    Whenever I've done it we never really used anything to cover it. But since its on slab, I know I've used some pvc conduit 90 to have the pipes come up nice and straight, its like a sleeve where it penetrates the concrete. But you don't really need to cover it with any wrap or anything for the whole run.

    image-1663481487.jpg
     
  14. Nov 6, 2012 #14

    stevemachine

    stevemachine

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    Actually what are you using for material? Pex is probably your best bet.
     
  15. Nov 6, 2012 #15

    johnjh2o

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    No matter what type pipe you use it must be covered were it penetrates the slab.

    John
     
  16. Nov 6, 2012 #16

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    I plan on running just normal copper tubing. So, no special wrapping needed on the run under the concrete, but use something where the lines enter and exit through the concrete. Got it. Thanks a lot.

    PS, I may be back once I get into the job...LOL
     
  17. Nov 7, 2012 #17

    stevemachine

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    Haha no sweat and ok good enough, if possible avoid couplings and fittings underground. One solid piece is your best bet, then you shouldn't have a problem with it leaking in the future
     
  18. Nov 10, 2012 #18

    Chuckman4112

    Chuckman4112

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    Okay guys, back for more adise. I cut the floor and the old kitchen drian did indeed cut straight across the floor. Perfect! Okay, not so perfect. Seems the pipe was in good shape until I got to the spot where I want to tie in. Cpmpletely rotted. And I am guessing that if I go further it will be rotted there also.

    I have found out though, that the old rotted kitchen drin was dedicated to the sink only. Nothing else is tied into it. Knowing that, it seems I can just leave it there to rot and find a new place to tie the drian into a good loction.

    If you look at the pictures, the old 2" and the 4" main our running side by side. My question is, do they make something I can adapt into the 4"drain. Something like this...

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CC-S0kSRlfc[/ame]

    and will that work??? If not, I think I am screwed big time.

    Thanks again.

    IMG_1948.JPG

    IMG_1949.jpg

    IMG_1950.jpg

    IMG_1951.jpg
     
  19. Nov 10, 2012 #19

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/shielded-couplings/proflex-couplings

    Link to a transition band that will allow you to change from the 4" cast iron to PVC or ABS.

    Do NOT use a rubber wye to cut into the 4". The cutter head on a sewer snake would eat such a fitting for breakfast.

    Use a PVC or ABS wye, and one of those transition bands on each side to attach it.

    To be honest, though, if the pipe is starting to get that rotten, you need to replace every bit of that pipe that you can get to.
     
  20. Nov 10, 2012 #20

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    OK, after watching that video, he did use an ABS wye instead of a rubber wye.

    But it is much better practice to use the shielded transition couplings I linked to instead of the rubber couplings he used. The shielded couplings will do a much better job of aligning the sections of pipe, though they are a bit harder to work with.
     

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