What kind of pump and setup?

Discussion in 'Septic Tanks' started by Johntodd, Feb 27, 2019.

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  1. Feb 27, 2019 #1

    Johntodd

    Johntodd

    Johntodd

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    Hi! Please forgive me if this topic has been done before - I'm such a newb I don't even know what to search for.

    My problem is this:
    There is an elderly couple down the road who can't afford to have their septic tanks pumped. So they asked me to look into it, which I am absolutely delighted to do for such nice people.

    I've looked into sewage pumps, such as this one:

    Acquaer 1/2 HP Durable Cast iron Sewage Pump with 10ft. power cord+Piggy back switch.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0782SJ1QJ/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

    But can't figure out what I need to attach a pipe to the intake so the pump can be used as needed. IOW, I want the pump to NOT go into the tank, rather, to sit at ground level OVER the tank. That way I can remove the whole pumping assembly and put it up somewhere for later use.

    Or should I just lower it on a rope and "feed" the pump down so that it keeps pumping? And just stop when it gets 3/4 way down? Will it torque sideways when I switch it on because of the rope?

    I know basic plumbing, but nothing like this. Please advise.

    Thanks in advance for your help!
    -John
     
  2. Feb 27, 2019 #2

    SHEPLMBR

    SHEPLMBR

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    You can legally pump a septic tank. That is a health issue. You must call a licensed septic pump company. Where were you going to pump it to?
     
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  3. Feb 27, 2019 #3

    Johntodd

    Johntodd

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    I have access to a portable tank. These folks septic tanks are 2 55-gallon plastic drums in the ground. They live way out on the country. They aren't hurting anybody out there. A local septic place will take the tank (since it is a small amount) for a small fee which I am paying. That way the elderly couple can have a working septic, the waste can get disposed of safely, and all is well.
     
  4. Feb 27, 2019 #4

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Is there a leach field associated with these 2 drums?
    OR is it set up as a cesspool or a dry well?
    I'm guessing it's acting as a dry well which would not leach for very long and require frequent pumping.???
    I assume only the toilet goes to these drums.

    I think you need a positive displacement pump if you want to sit at ground level.
    What you show for a pump, is a submersible, centrifugal pump, which must stay primed to pump.

    A typical septic tank generally has a grease/scum layer on top and heavy sludge layer on bottom, which as you must know, typically requires a strong suction hose.

    Don't know any of the details regarding what EXACTLY you'll be pumping, I would guess you'd have to lower the pump into each drum and push the remaining solid towards the pump suction. This would likely entail adding additional water to help the process.

    You better do more research on the appropriate pump to use(including talking the the manufacturers) and/or a different approach.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2019
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  5. Feb 27, 2019 #5

    Johntodd

    Johntodd

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    It is a two-tank system, and the overflow vents down into a gully. They own a nice parcel of land, and the overflow stuff gets trapped in a gully on their land and nature processes it. It's a really old system installed back in the 80s.

    It's the first tank (solids) that is full. A recent earthquake shifted the pipes around and caused the pipe into the overflow to be higher than the inlet from the house. Therefore, excess water won't flow out and it backs up into the inlet pipe causing clogs to settle in. I've used a tape on it and busted quite a few soft clogs.

    I guess what I'll be pumping is standard septic tank stuff.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2019 #6

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Refresh/reload the page to see my edits, in my first reply.

    Yeah if you expect to pump a container full of solids you should check with the Mfr of the proposed pump. Solids suspended in a liquid is one thing but a mass of viscous matter is another, from a pumping standpoint.
     
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  7. Feb 27, 2019 #7

    Johntodd

    Johntodd

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    Thanks for the info.

    As for adding water, I've read that pros will sometimes use a garden hose to add water and then a paint stirrer on a drill to bust the sludge and mix it with water so it can be pumped. Seems straightforward to me.
     
  8. Feb 28, 2019 #8

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    I'm glad to hear it sounds like you know what to expect and have done some research.
    Best of luck to you.
     
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  9. Feb 28, 2019 #9

    CT18

    CT18

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    Cant imagine anything will go wrong here. Why not just pay someone who knows how to handle the issue and then have her pay you back in baked goods. Could you please film this.
     
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  10. Feb 28, 2019 #10

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    LOL
    Based on the size of the drums, it sounds like it may be a frequent and ongoing task. That's a lot of baked goods.
    But I give him credit to take on the task, as it's obviously not an easy one.
    I think the right pump will make all the difference in the world.
     
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  11. Feb 28, 2019 #11

    CT18

    CT18

    CT18

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    Yeah those size drums dont allow enough time for the organisms to do there job. You would think a pumper company would do it for a decent price as they would be repeat frequent customers.
     
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