Washing Machine Hook Up

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Jesse Godard, Nov 18, 2019.

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  1. Nov 18, 2019 #1

    Jesse Godard

    Jesse Godard

    Jesse Godard

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    Good day all,

    I just recently purshaced a house and the set up for the washing machine is something I am unfamiliar with. Growing up I've always had my washers just drain into a utility sink beside it, now I have no sink and the drain for the machine goes straight up before heading out. I am wanting to use my machine that I brought with me vise the one that came with the house but I am at a loss on how to make it work.

    I am a very unhandy person, my skill set is more computer lines then drain lines. So I have put some pictures to hopefully shed some light on this. Hopefully someone can help me with my situation.

    Thanks in advance,

    Jesse
    20191118_122608.jpg 20191118_122752.jpg 20191118_122620.jpg 20191118_122649.jpg 20191118_122729.jpg
     
  2. Nov 18, 2019 #2

    havasu

    havasu

    havasu

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    Are planning on using the washer pump to send the water up to the above floor to drain out?
     
  3. Nov 18, 2019 #3

    Jesse Godard

    Jesse Godard

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    Sorry I don't understand. The drain line runs straight up to the ceiling then across the room. Eventually it ends up connected to the out.
     
  4. Nov 18, 2019 #4

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    The washing machine should not have to pump up that high to drain.
    It is designed only to pump right out the top of the back of the machine.
    From there, it should empty into a drain that carries away the water by gravity.

    The way yours is now, it is making the washing machine drain pump work waaaay too hard.
    And all that dirty water in the pipe going up to the ceiling wants to drain back into the machine, which it probably does to some degree.

    That system you have was set up by an idiot.

    You need to pipe your laundry discharge to a sewer, or to a sewage pump pit in the basement.

    Or at least to a sump pump pit, but this is not legal in some places because the laundry discharge is not clear water, it is full of lint and soap.

    But discharging into a sump pit is pretty common.
    It might cause a smell as the lint rots away in there, and the fibers can shorten the life of the sump pump.

    Alternatively, you can buy a self-contained system with a small holding tank with a pump inside it.
    The wash water dumps into the holding tank, and the pump inside pumps it up and away.
    The black plastic pipe shown going up the wall might be a suitable drain for that pump to discharge into, but that can’t be verified without looking at the whole route it takes, and its condition.

    I believe you have to have a laundry slop sink also, which the washing machine water dumps into.
    Because the washing machine can drain so fast, it might exceed the pumping speed of the pump in the tank.
    Then the tank pump takes that sink drain water and pumps it away.

    Look up “laundry tray system” on Google.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2019
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  5. Nov 18, 2019 #5

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    This is what you need.
     
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  6. Nov 18, 2019 #6

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    That under sink-mounted pump is a cool idea, but it looks hard to get at for servicing.
    And the outlet is one inch, and at high pressure.
    That sounds like a system used for up-flush toilets, like a Saniflo system.
    They tend to die when something un-choppable gets into them.

    And I am leery of hanging all that weight off the bottom of the sink, also there are twisting torsional forces when the pump cycles.

    Also, chunky stuff and other debris tend to get washed down a laundry tub drain.
    A more conventional laundry tray pump sitting in a small holding tank has the ability for some of that debris to settle out into the bottom of the tank.
    Although they are designed to pass small solids.

    This pump in the video has to pass everything right through it.

    Maybe it has a grinder function, like a sewage pump would have, to demolish small solids that have to pass through it?
     
  7. Nov 19, 2019 #7

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    It looks relatively easy to get at.
    The one I found was 1-1/4" discharge.
    There are many of these units on the market now and I believe they were design for laundry sinks. In fact, opposed to a separate sump that would typically require a trap at the sink and a vent connection to the house vent piping(like a long ways away) it has been approved, as stated in the video.
    You think 16 lbs. is too heavy?
    The sink and pump are sold as a package and has at least a 2 year guarantee.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
  8. Nov 19, 2019 #8

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    If they don’t need a vent, that is a big plus.

    If the pump is hung onto a strong bracket, and not just hanging from the sink drain, then it is pbly going to be fine.
     
  9. Nov 19, 2019 #9

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Yes I think not needing a vent is a big plus.
     
  10. Nov 19, 2019 #10

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    I have read that typical laundry tray systems are often set up without a proper vent, even though I assume that violates code.

    If there is a check valve on the discharge line, that would keep sewer gas from entering the holding tank.
    So some folks just add a standpipe of a few feet, to keep water from splashing out as the washer is filling the tank, and the standpipe lets the air pressure equalize in and out.
    There is some smell from soap and old lint, but if the pump does a good job there is not much stink.

    Or a simple vent from the tank is just run out the nearest wall to the outside, like you would for a high efficiency furnace.
    Not legal, but it is done pretty often.
    This same venting is often done with macerating toilets like a Saniflo.
    Not legal, but it’s what people do.
     

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