Trying to find NIBCO cartridge

Discussion in 'Plumbing Products' started by Bgmac, Jul 4, 2019.

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  1. Jul 4, 2019 #1

    Bgmac

    Bgmac

    Bgmac

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    Anyone know where I could find a replacement cartridge for my outdoor NIBCO spigots? I had to put caps on them to keep them from constantly leaking. I am having a hard time finding the right replacement parts. Thanks in advance.

    NIBCO_S.jpg
     
  2. Jul 4, 2019 #2

    Geofd

    Geofd

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    if its just aworn out washer at the bottom of the stem you can get washer/bib screw kits any where and just match up the washer
     
  3. Jul 4, 2019 #3

    Bgmac

    Bgmac

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    Good info. Its not the stem that's leaking, its the valve. constant drips out of the hose/male opening with the valve closed tight. I figured it would be best to replace the valve cartridge since the body is sweated on the line. Its difficult to get to the line joint since its sweated inside the foundation bricks under the house with only like 2 foot of crawl space.
     
  4. Jul 7, 2019 #4

    Bgmac

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    I guess I am SOL. I was able to figure out that the valve body is a NIBCO U63 CL 1/2. I emailed NIBCO tech support and got this response:

    From NIBCO- That was discontinued years ago (over a decade)- NIBCO no longer has any replacement parts available.

    So I guess I will have to just cap the valve to keep it from leaking and eventually sweat a newer style valve body. Was trying to avoid replacing it since its in the foundation block and under the house with virtually no room to work on it.
     
  5. Jul 8, 2019 #5

    phishfood

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    Regrinding the seat and replacing the washer might fix your problem. Replacement of the hose bib is the best fix.
     
  6. Jul 8, 2019 #6

    Geofd

    Geofd

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    under that nut in your pic is what I call the stem so you will have to shut the water off to your spikot remove the stem and check the condition of the washer and screw the rubber washer is your water seal that's why its leaking
     
  7. Jul 8, 2019 #7

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    The posters above are likely correct.

    It does not look like a “cartridge” type faucet.

    You probably just need to turn off the water pressure supplying that sillcock, usually at the water meter in most houses.

    Then just open the valve a half-turn or so, to lift the washer off the valve seat to reduce friction, and then crank out the guts of the sillcock by turning the cap nut counter-clockwise until it is totally free and then twist out the valve stem by the handle, also counter-clockwise.

    Then you should see a black rubber or plastic washer at the end of the valve stem, held on by a tiny screw.

    You can buy new washers to replace your worn out one. They also often come with new screws.
    There are lots of different sizes of washers and screws, so carefully remove the old screw, and bring it and the old washer and valve stem to a hardware or big box store to find exact replacements.

    If the old screw is rusted in tight, soak it for a few hours in straight vinegar, then dry it off well, then apply some penetrating oil or wd40 to it.

    Then gently bang the screw head a few times, straight down against a piece of scrap wood, to shock it enough for the oil to find little gaps in the rust to sneak through.

    In an hour or so the screw should loosen up.
    If you force it and it snaps off, you are SOL for sure, unless you can drill out the old screw and force in a new slightly fatter one.

    Even if the valve seat is corroded and might ideally need grinding, you might be able to get away with just cleaning out the crud on it with some vinegar or CLR type calcium cleaner, and rubbing hard on its surface with a skinny wood dowel, or something like a plastic toothbrush handle.
    Just to knock off the minerals and grit that will interfere with the new washer making a good seal.
     
  8. Jul 8, 2019 #8

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    PS if you do need to bang the screw head a little bit to shock it, be very accurate and don’t bang up the bottom of the valve stem.

    There is often a very flimsy kind of a metal rim that partially surrounds the washer, it is easily bent and you will have trouble getting the new washer to fit or seal if you deform it.
     

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