Sink venting question

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Otahyoni, Apr 30, 2014.

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  1. Apr 30, 2014 #1

    Otahyoni

    Otahyoni

    Otahyoni

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    My kitchen sink, sump pump, and washing machine all use the same drain line that is currently not vented. When the sump pump kicks on it blows bubbles in the kitchen sink, then when it shuts off it siphons some of the water out of the trap and gurgles. There is no toilet connected to this line. It's just a straight leach line.

    Here's a picture of the plumbing in the area.
    [​IMG]


    I don't have a way to get a vent up through the wall so I was thinking about going through the floor joist on the left to get outside then up the side if the house to just below the eave. My question is which 1.5" line should I hook the vent to? The line in the left is for the washer and the one that goes up through the floor is the kitchen sink. The sump pump is the 3/4" line on the right

    This drain system is not connected to the bathroom in any way.

    Thanks for the help. :)
     
  2. May 1, 2014 #2

    phishfood

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    First thing is that code in my area, and I believe most other areas, requires kitchen sinks and laundry machines to drain into standard sewer or septic systems. Lint from laundry and grease and food waste from kitchens will tend to cause leach fields to fail much faster.

    You have plenty of room to run the kitchen drain over to the sanitary sewer, and then you can use an air admittance valve to vent it. Or, if code in your area doesn't allow that, code in my area will let me oversize the pipe, add a cleanout under the sink, and draw it's vent from the main drain line.

    Does the sewer come into the basement low enough to allow you to run the laundry around to it?
     
  3. May 4, 2014 #3

    Otahyoni

    Otahyoni

    Otahyoni

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    That's not good... :(

    No. The septic line comes through the wall higher than this line by two blocks.

    I have no idea what code in my area is. I'm doing all the work myself with no inspections. Plumbing drains is really the only thing i didn't already have experience doing.
     
  4. May 5, 2014 #4

    phishfood

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    I would try to find out the maximum vertical lift that your washing machine can pump.

    If you can't get a washing machine that will pump high enough to make it back to the sewer, then the RIGHT fix is to install a sump and an ejector pump. Either way, the kitchen can be piped ovehead into the gravity sewer .
     
  5. May 5, 2014 #5

    journeyman

    journeyman

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    Is that 4 inch line going to your septic?
     
  6. May 5, 2014 #6

    Otahyoni

    Otahyoni

    Otahyoni

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    No. This line and the septic line are on opposite sides of the house and are not connected in any way.
     

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