PVC Setup in Crawl Space Minor Code Issue- What Should I Do?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Building Code' started by amodoko, Dec 4, 2019.

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  1. Dec 4, 2019 #1

    amodoko

    amodoko

    amodoko

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    I was trying to remove an old shower and install a pre-made shower pan in a condo and made some mistakes. I had to redo the PVC plumbing to the shower pan below ground to have the new shower pan drain line up properly with the P-trap below. The PVC below is all underground and only accessible as a crawl space. It is nasty down there since this is a multi-story condo unit and I'm on the first floor so I have a crawl space. I was trying to redo the plumbing from above by reaching down into the hole in the concrete floor and solvent welding all the PVC that way. That way I wouldn't have to crawl through that crawl space. However, doing it that way caused me to screw up a lot. I did not touch the old P-trap and instead added two 45 degree elbows to get the drain to line up. Well I didn't do it perfectly and the new setup was still off. So then I added two 22 degree PVC fittings above that and that worked perfectly to line up with the new drain. Not pretty, but functional. Anyways, I realized later on that the 22.5 degree PVC fittings were DWV but the 45 degree fittings I used were pressure PVC fittings and not DWV fittings, and I don't believe that meets code. I already installed the shower pan but haven't installed the shower walls at all. The shower pan has a mechanical drain that compresses a rubber fitting to seal it, and I tried unscrewing it but it won't budge at the moment (maybe if I try harder I can get it one day). So what should I do you think? Should I go in the crawl space and try to redo the plumbing? Or do you think this is something that will be flagged during an inspection when the condo is sold one day? Here are a few pictures of my issue. You can see the types of 45 degree elbows and 22.5 degree elbows I used that I solvent welded together (total of 4 fittings) in the photos up close, then you can see the pipe all solvent welded together with the fittings, and then you can see it all installed in the shower pan. I also leak tested the PVC fittings and pipe with a pump sprayer before installing the shower pan, no leaks at all, but the whole code issue makes me uncomfortable. This is in Missouri by the way.
     

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  2. Dec 4, 2019 #2

    breplum

    breplum

    breplum

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    The functional part will work but the reason to not use pressure fittings is that gunk will hang up on the pipe sections and cause smell and can possibly build up with hair and scum.
    It sure could end up being called out on inspection, but I sure see a lot worse that is missed. And you can then, credit the issue to the new buyers or pay to have it corrected.
    Best to do it right and sleep better.
    I recommend cutting out the p-trap, use a no hub coupling to start off the run and work back from a straight drain coming down from the shower drain fitting. The no-hub coupling can give you a little fudge factor help.
    6 mil plastic rolled out can make for nicer work space, or ...
    If you don't want to crawl, pony up and have a professional do it.
     
  3. Dec 4, 2019 #3

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    I think many home inspectors are retired pros who got tired of crawling around in tight spots like your crawl space.

    So if they run the shower, and plug the drain briefly with a rag, then let it drain and the water zooms away, they will never go under there.
     
  4. Dec 4, 2019 #4

    amodoko

    amodoko

    amodoko

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    I agree, I doubt it will ever be checked from underground. But since I'm a bit OCD I think I'm just going to redo it with only DWV fittings and solvent weld it all in. I wish I didn't care, but it's going to bother me. Ugh. Here is one I did on another project for a tub. Do you guys see any errors in the picture I've attached below? I'm pretty new to this stuff so still learning what's acceptable and what isn't.
     

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