Prepping for winter?

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by mikej, Jan 13, 2010.

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  1. Jan 13, 2010 #1

    mikej

    mikej

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    I live in south Texas and it just started hitting freezing to where I have to wrap my faucets. Is there anything I should do for my automated watering system? I've had it off since late fall but now that I'm thinking about it couldn't the water in those pipes freeze too?
     
  2. Jan 13, 2010 #2

    Conway

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    Good question. I never thought about it. Have you gone back and reviewed the instruction manual?
     
  3. Jan 14, 2010 #3

    majakdragon

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    Sprinkler systems should be drained when turned off for the season.
     
  4. Jan 14, 2010 #4

    mikej

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    I tried to find out how to do it but I can't even find the manual online. Any body here know hot to drain one?
     
  5. Jan 14, 2010 #5

    havasu

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    Many irrigation lines can be drained by going to the lowest point of your irrigation line, and removing the sprinkler. You would then need to break the seal at the valve to allow air into the lines. I've also heard you can use an air compressor by forcing air into the line, but again, the valve would need to be opened fully to bleed out any excess water.
     
  6. Jan 15, 2010 #6

    irrig8

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    I had this whole thing typed up, step by step and I accidentally hit the back button.

    Try this:Winterizing Your Irrigation System

    If you need more help, I'd be more than happy to assist.
     
  7. Jan 21, 2010 #7

    speedbump

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    Most folks use an air compressor to blow them out. It's not full proof, but it will get most of the water out in most cases.
     
  8. Jun 1, 2010 #8

    donald1

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    yes he sounds real.
     
  9. Oct 29, 2011 #9

    DCPlumber

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    I winterize/drain approximately 225 houses each Fall. I also winterize a dozen or so lawn sprinkler systems. I tow a 4 cylinder diesel air compressor behind my work van and hook on to the main water line that feeds the sprinkler system. All of the sprinkler systems in our area of Rain Bird systems. There is a setting labeled "test all valves". It opens each zone for 2 minutes while I apply a lot of air volume, not just pressure. I go through the cycle three times. In ten years, I've never had a sprinkler system freeze and break, and it gets down to -15 degrees F here. I'd say it is fool proof if it is done correctly. I can blow out a 10 zone system, including travel time in about 1.5 hours. Fairly inexpensive to the average homeowner that afford a 10 zone system.
     
  10. Mar 16, 2012 #10

    cswanson

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    The air compressor method is probably the best way to go about forcing the water out.
     
  11. Mar 30, 2012 #11

    CornerWrench

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    Little late to weigh in but I did irrigation service in Dallas for 30 years and nobody blew out irrigation lines. The south Texas freeze line is what? 3" at most maybe. The best thing you can do is to water well before a hard freeze. Water in the soil helps insulate both the pipes and plants. Any above ground irrigation lines that have water in them do need to be wrapped.
     

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