Help with installing a new Vanity that is further out from the wall than original

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dl6421

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Hi, I'm new to this. I am trying to install a new vanity in my bathroom but the drain is a couple of inches further out from the wall than the original sink drain.
Unfortunately, the pipe coming out of the wall turns downward so it's not as easy as extending that pipe straight out. Any help on how to handle this? I could cut the bend from the pipe coming out of the wall so that I can extend it straight out but I didn't want to mess with that unless necessary. Here is the current pipe/ sink. Thank you!
 

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Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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Looks like a rusty old mess down there...

Assuming you are going to replace the vanity with same exposed kind, then you'll probably want a chrome P-Trap, and they come with pieces long enough for your needs. In fact they are probably so long that you'll have to cut to fit.

There's a price to pay for chrome plated brass exposed plumbing. This stuff will be 10x the cost of plastic if you had an enclosed vanity.
 

dl6421

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Thanks for your response! The new vanity is enclosed. The problem is that regular P-traps (at least those that I've seen) are meant to go horizontally straight into a pipe coming out of the wall. In this case, the pipe coming out of the wall turns downward, so the regular P-trap won't connect to it. I think that's why they used the rubber J-trap here. I'm not sure what to do about that.

Looks like a rusty old mess down there...

Assuming you are going to replace the vanity with same exposed kind, then you'll probably want a chrome P-Trap, and they come with pieces long enough for your needs. In fact they are probably so long that you'll have to cut to fit.

There's a price to pay for chrome plated brass exposed plumbing. This stuff will be 10x the cost of plastic if you had an enclosed vanity.
 

Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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Enclosed vanity, that's good. You can use conventional plastic parts.

The P trap assemblies consist of several parts. Familarize yourselves with these parts. There's the trap itself (yours is the rubber part); and the extension. The sink's tailpiece (another part not included) slides into the trap, and is tightened with a compression ring and nut. I've run into situations where I've needed to change or extend the sink's tailpiece.

Then the extension fits on the end of the trap, and generally has a built in compression (no extra washer needed) and its tightened with another bit nut. the extension goes into the wall and is generally tightened with a compression washer and nut.

You may have an issue (can't tell from here) because you are taking out a metal extension and replacing with plastic; I don't know whats behind the trim piece covering it up.
 

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dl6421

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Ah, thank you. So you're saying I possibly need to remove the pipe coming out of the wall and replace it? I was a bit nervous to mess with that since it's so old and if it breaks or doesn't come out easily, I would have to go through the tile to get to the pipe. Here is a picture of what it looks like behind the trim.
 

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Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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Yes, you would NORMALLY remove that pipe. I say normally, because under normal circumstances, that pipe is part of the p-trap assembly, and is fit to a fitting coming from the wall with a slip fitting and compression nuts. Easy. BUT it looks to me like yours may be soldered in place or something. Ah, jeez! What a fool that did that.

What I would do is measure the OD of the pipe that's there. See if you can get a rubber coupling that will fit between that and the plastic part of a normal P-trap assembly like the one in the photo I sent earlier.

Alternatively you could try to unsolder that pipe. Or break through that tile piece (don't worry will be all covered up with the new vanity) get to the vertical and do it right.

Such a bear when you run into this nasty old stuff done just wrong.
 

dl6421

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Thank you. That was very helpful.


Yes, you would NORMALLY remove that pipe. I say normally, because under normal circumstances, that pipe is part of the p-trap assembly, and is fit to a fitting coming from the wall with a slip fitting and compression nuts. Easy. BUT it looks to me like yours may be soldered in place or something. Ah, jeez! What a fool that did that.

What I would do is measure the OD of the pipe that's there. See if you can get a rubber coupling that will fit between that and the plastic part of a normal P-trap assembly like the one in the photo I sent earlier.

Alternatively you could try to unsolder that pipe. Or break through that tile piece (don't worry will be all covered up with the new vanity) get to the vertical and do it right.

Such a bear when you run into this nasty old stuff done just wrong.
 

Jim Jensen

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take the RUBBER HOSE off, and send us a pic of what the BOTTOM of that down-turned pipe looks like ??? It might be a threaded fitting, part of an old trap ???
 

dl6421

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Yes, the pipe itself isn't threaded but there is a threaded ring right above the rubber hose that was meant to attach to another pipe. I'm guessing that maybe it is stripped since they replaced with the rubber.

take the RUBBER HOSE off, and send us a pic of what the BOTTOM of that down-turned pipe looks like ??? It might be a threaded fitting, part of an old trap ???
 

CT18

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I bet it is rotted which is what will happen to the rest of that chrome in due time. It may be time to look at getting into that wall an updating some of that sanitary piping. It appears a lot closer to the end of life cycle than the beginning. Just saying
 
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