Concern/Risk using CPVC at Shower

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by burchis, Sep 28, 2011.

  1. Sep 28, 2011 #1

    burchis

    burchis

    burchis

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    I am roughing-in an extra bathroom and plan on using CPVC for service. I have read that there is a lot of expansion and compression with this material.

    My concern is with the supply line from the bathtub faucet up to the shower head, which is about 48".

    Since both ends will be securely fastened what problems could I expect? What options do I have?

    Thanks for your replies.
     
  2. Sep 28, 2011 #2

    Chris

    Chris

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    CPVC is mainly a hot water pipe and should not expand or contract any more then regular PVC pipe does. From what I have read it just holds up better over time with the heat then regular PVC pipe. I actually use it for sewer pipe on a few of my jobsites in the renewable energy departments and have not experienced any problems even where it mates up with the manholes. Another question is why are you using this over copper or poly?
     
  3. Sep 28, 2011 #3

    Mr_David

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    I've notice here on the forum that they use a lot of PVC/CPVC inside for domestic water systems Hot and cold.
    Typically here it's used for in the ground service and irrigation.
     
  4. Sep 29, 2011 #4

    phishfood

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    I have used CPVC for the shower head riser on many occasions, and so far have had no issues with it. Copper does provide a little more rigidity for the shower arm, though.
     
  5. Sep 29, 2011 #5

    burchis

    burchis

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    Thanks for your reply phishfood.

    I thought about creating a flexible loop between the faucet and shower head. Basically build a "U-shape" supply. i.e. From the faucet- run a 4" horizontal and then 90 up to another 4" horizontal back to the shower head.

    Another option would be to use a 24" flex hose connected between the faucet and shower head.

    Anyone else have any ideas?
     
  6. Jul 10, 2014 #6

    barnabas1969

    barnabas1969

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    I always use rigid copper between the faucet and the drop elbow for the shower head. It's much stronger and resists breakage due to someone pulling (or whatever) on the shower head.
     

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