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Can I use Silicone instead of Plumbers Putty?

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BadPlumber

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I read people put some underneath the flange instead of plumbers Putty.
also in between the bottom of the sink and the rubber gasket.

is this correct?

will I need to put any anywhere else?

thanks!
 

arctic bill

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I use putty under the part of the sink that holds the plug, under the sink before and after the rubber gasket, and also on the chrome tail piece threads
showers, under the top art, under the shower on rubber gasket, after the gasket ,
tubs,
under the part that holds the plug, under the tub, before and after the rubber gasket .
i use only plumbers stainless putty
1610653556921.png
 

Helper Dave

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2nd opinion ...

We use silicone under the flange, pipe dope on any threads on the tailpiece, and a little on the rubber gasket (only on the mating surface).

I would NOT put silicone on the gaskets, or under the sink at all.
 

Jeff Handy

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Silicone can work on the rubber gasket and on the tailpiece threads.
BUT, you have to wait a few hours to run water to test for leaks, so why bother with that?
Pipe dope works just as well, and has no waiting time.

I use good old putty under the drain flange, for the same reason.
Also, silicone is messy and hard to clean up, putty wipes away easy peasy.
IMHO.
 

HWSleuth

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Jeff is “right on”! I just wish he would say “pipe joint compound” instead of ”pipe dope.” There’s a lot of “not quite right” plumbers out here that tried to smoke it because it’s referred to as “dope.” 😏
 

rickwhoo

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I used silicon only on the last 2 sink drains I replaced recently. But only on the flange where it seals meets sink. Nothing under the sink or on the gasket.
 

Zomar

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In my experience this is what silicone does to plumbing parts. The builders contractor did this to an entire building 130 suites. Problems didn’t become evident until after about 4 or 5 years Maybe it’s the brand of silicone used? Either way I don’t understand the aversion to using tried and true plumbers putty.
 

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rickwhoo

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In my experience this is what silicone does to plumbing parts. The builders contractor did this to an entire building 130 suites. Problems didn’t become evident until after about 4 or 5 years Maybe it’s the brand of silicone used? Either way I don’t understand the aversion to using tried and true plumbers putty.
All I see it crappy metal rotting away. How is this caused by silicon?
 

fixitron

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Pure silicone caulk (NOT acrylic latex with silicone) should be used under the flange of the drain only when the sink is stone, such as marble or some synthetic stones. NO silicone caulk on any other part of a drain assembly. Once installed, the assembly must not be disturbed for at least 24 hours, or it will not completely set and will leak.
All others should use plumbers putty under the flange. It would be desirable to coat the rubber gasket with a pure silicone paste for longevity (not plumbers grease). Use a teflon tape on the threads of a threaded connection, such as the tailpiece. All other joints rely on only the compression of a gasket.
 

arctic bill

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It is important to put putty under sink part that holds the plug, If not then the water will leak out of sink . the same as a bathtub .
 

Jeff Handy

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Pure silicone caulk (NOT acrylic latex with silicone) should be used under the flange of the drain only when the sink is stone, such as marble or some synthetic stones. NO silicone caulk on any other part of a drain assembly. Once installed, the assembly must not be disturbed for at least 24 hours, or it will not completely set and will leak.
All others should use plumbers putty under the flange. It would be desirable to coat the rubber gasket with a pure silicone paste for longevity (not plumbers grease). Use a teflon tape on the threads of a threaded connection, such as the tailpiece. All other joints rely on only the compression of a gasket.
What’s wrong with just using non-staining putty under the sink flange?
So you can leak test everything, go home, and not have to worry about a call back.
Most of the sinks I have done were not that high end, but I have done a few natural stone, and had no complaints.
However, I am here to learn, and would like to hear more from both sides on silicone vs non-staining putty.
 

Zomar

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All I see it crappy metal rotting away. How is this caused by silicon?

Silicones are popular because of their superior adhesion to certain metals, such as steel. There are two types of silicone caulks: acid cure and neutral cure. Neutral-cure silicones are used successfully in metal fabrication projects. Acid-cure silicones, on the other hand, can have a corrosive reaction with galvanized metals.

How does this all work? According to Silicones: Chemistry and Corrosion, “Single part silicone sealers generally contain a cross-linking catalyst (such as a tin compound) that is activated upon exposure to moisture in the air.” When acetic acid is released, it attacks and corrodes metals such as copper, zinc, brass, and galvanized steel. In addition to causing galvanic reaction, it also prevents proper adhesion of the silicone to the metal.
 

FishScreener

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Plumbers putty, because it doesn’t have a set time, and you can easily clean out any that squeezes out.

Silicone has problems: First is that you have to wait for it to set up. Second, once dry if you ever need to redo things, once the stuff is dry the only ting that which will stick to it is, NOTHING. And finally, it has acetic acid in it, which attacks many metals, including copper, iron, and aluminum.
 

rickwhoo

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Plumbers putty, because it doesn’t have a set time, and you can easily clean out any that squeezes out.

Silicone has problems: First is that you have to wait for it to set up. Second, once dry if you ever need to redo things, once the stuff is dry the only ting that which will stick to it is, NOTHING. And finally, it has acetic acid in it, which attacks many metals, including copper, iron, and aluminum.
Not all silicon has acid in it. I've used it many times and never had any issues.
 

Zomar

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Not all silicon has acid in it. I've used it many times and never had any issues.
This is just sad to hear, and I’m sure neutral cure at double the price is not being purchased. Issues may not arise for 5 years instead of 15 with putty. If the silicone fails and things need to be cleaned up; one might learn to see the positive side to putty and why it’s been around for so long and still used today.
 

Twowaxhack

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This is just sad to hear, and I’m sure neutral cure at double the price is not being purchased. Issues may not arise for 5 years instead of 15 with putty. If the silicone fails and things need to be cleaned up; one might learn to see the positive side to putty and why it’s been around for so long and still used today.
Many of kohler install instructions for their tubs call for silicone when connecting the drain.

I personally do not have a set practice. It simply depends on circumstances.

Silicone doesn’t cause an issue for quality brass plumbing parts.

One thing is for certain, I rarely have call backs or leaks and when I do, I repair them for free. So you can bet I do what works. No money is made when you’re chasing your tail.
 
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