Zoeller M53 switch arm

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JWR4

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Water was leaking around the rubber of the switch arm inside the Zoeller M53 pump in my cellar. How is the old switch arm removed? I have replaced the switch in the past, but can't figure out how to remove the switch arm. I don't want to force it, so would like to know just how to remove it and replace it.

Is it necessary to replace the arm? Could I just cover the area with a waterproof silicone, or would that just wear out to quickly?
 

waterwelldude

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The switch is not really designed to be changed. Your idea of covering the pivot point with silicone would be something to try first before taking it apart for repair.

I found this picture of the one I believe you have, just to give some in-site on the switch.


 

DUNBAR PLUMBING

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An engineer down at Zoeller told me those switches are only good for 90,000 cycles, possibly less.


When they leak, it's replacement time. I install the N53 with adjustable float switch. The N53 pump will last decades, only the switch will need replacement which is external and replaceable.
 

Davethebuilder

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That switch arm is replaceable. I just did it. I first contacted Zoeller and they sent me the new arm and gasket assembly next day shipping for free.First remove the switch cover housing on the pump.Then remove the switch itself. To remove the old switch arm assembly from the switch housing, simply place it in a vice, careful not to crack the housing. Using a hammer and larger sized nail punch (socket extension works well also) Punch the entire assembly out from the inside of the housing. The new assembly came complete with a small tube of locktite which you will apply to the opening in the switch housing (after thoroughly cleaning it) and to the cylinder around the switch arm assembly. Make sure the arm is positioned correctly for proper operation and tap it in from the outside inwards using a socket slipped over the switch arm to ensure an even seat, it also gives you wider surface to tap on. Kinda like a freeze plug in a car. Make sure the switch is still good, check all electrical connectors and replace if you feel necessary, mine were corroded due to the water sitting in the housing. And reassemble. Hope that helps anyone in the future as I was brought to this site searching for the same answer. Have nice day....Dave
 
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DUNBAR PLUMBING

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^^^^^


I believe the above remedy is possible, but from a plumbing contractor point of view, my responsibility is to provide a reliable, working product without the hint of considering a cheaper/inexpensive fix at the mercy of the property owner.


I believe that a factory seal will supercede the best implied warranty coming from Zoeller pump company themselves, long before a plumber would even get the chance to sit in a courtroom and tell their side of the story how they saved the customer only $100 in replacing the switch over the entire unit without an implied warranty, and that's the reason the basement flooded and did thousands in damage.


It'll never go to court... the insurance company of the property owner will pay the bill and just collect off my insurance.

I cannot takes risks like the above, but if any property owner wants to do that, I respect that knowing the chances they take. One instant the seal is leaking in that equation of the cap, it's going to be a moment of memorable proportions as the pump will fail, and the cost of a new one looks very reasonable at that point.

I don't take gambles with my customers and their personal property in the risk of liability and damage.

I'm also the guy who comes in after someone has taken 'those' chances and found out the reasonable difference.
 

Davethebuilder

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^^^^
All good points. I responded to this post as a guide for the OP or any other Do-It-Yourselfer to fix their own pump. I am not a plumber, I am a Builder, if I were this would not be the route I would take either for a paying customer. The time and effort involved would probably cost more in billable hours than to just replace the pump. My pump was three years old. I have a feeling this switch arm was leaking from day one due to the amount of corrosion inside the switch housing. Also Zoeller was more than happy to replace and send the new assembly for free, which tends to make think this isn't the first time they've had this problem. I was just trying to help some of us that are capable of fixing similar issues on our own. Have a nice Day....Dave
 

VivianLaura

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Generally, the only negative I could find was that you may have to replace the switch every few years depending on how often your pump is made to switch on and off. The switch arm is stainless steel to limit corrosion. If wedo have to replace the switch, that would not be an unusual thing for any sump pump and a replacement switch is easy to obtain and fairly inexpensive.
plumbing services stockton
 

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