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Whole House Water Filter

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mooli

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Hi.
We have in our house a whole house water filter.

It is an American Plumber housing, model WC-34PR.
Until recently, we did not know it existed, so it has not been replaced since we bought the house, 2 years ago.
1st question: If we replace the filter and clean the casing, is there any problem continuing to use it?

Our water sometimes has what seems to be grains of sand in it.
The drinking water, which is filtered through a reverse osmosis, under the sink filtration system, tastes excellent, but still seems to have small white particles floating in it.

2nd question: I would appreciate your assistance in understanding what type of whole house water filter, is recommended for this type of Whole House Filter casing. How do I know what fits it and what does not?

3rd question: I saw there are many different types- polypropylene, spun polypropylene, string wound, carbon, cellulose and more. I am uncertain what I need and would appreciate your assistance, explanations and recommendations, regarding the differences, before going to buy one.

Thank you in advance!
S.E.
 

KULTULZ

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W-34PR & WC34-PR - Standard



The part no. is just the filter housing. You would buy the element(s) (cartridges) to insert i the housing to try and filter/control whatever water problem(s) you have.

IMO, you should first do a water analysis. If on municipal water, you might only be concerned with sediments, chlorine and chloromines.
 

Matt30

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Those "whole house" filters are good for sediment and small particles, that's pretty much it. The charcoal filters will filter out a bit of bad taste. Don't put too much trust into it as full water treatment.

The filters are measured in microns. The smaller the micron number ( 3 or 5) the finer particles it will filter. 10 micron and up will filter larger sediment.
 

speedbump

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I fully agree with Matt. They are pretty much useless. A real whole house filter would be much bigger and designed for a certain purpose. Such as softening or iron removal. If you feel you must have one, the carbon filter is the only one I would recommend for removing a little bit of chlorine. Be advised that bacteria can multiply in a carbon filter, so don't leave it in too long.

If you don't want to deal with it, just remove the cartridge and leave it out.
 

speedbump

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DFBonnett

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I'm going to disagree with some in this thread. I have a whole house filter under my kitchen sink filtering just that cold water which we use for drinking, cooking, ice etc. With the charcoal filter it does a great job of improving the taste of the water. I did the same at my daughter's house.
 

speedbump

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How often do you change the filters?
And so you know, carbon filters are the only ones I do recommend for some things.
 

KULTULZ

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Server Error in Application "NSF WEBSITE-240"
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HTTP Error 404.0 - Not Found
The resource you are looking for has been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.
Hmm... Either I slurred my URL or they must have gotten a bad glass of water... :eek:

-Point-of-Use and Point-of-Entry (POU/POE) Systems-

You will have to click through to see all the information-
 

KULTULZ

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I'm going to disagree with some in this thread. I have a whole house filter under my kitchen sink filtering just that cold water which we use for drinking, cooking, ice etc.

With the charcoal filter it does a great job of improving the taste of the water. I did the same at my daughter's house.
What you have is a Point-of-Use filter. Another example would be a shower filter.

A Whole House Filter (Point-of-Entry) would be installed @ the incoming supply line and filter all fixtures.

And yes, they work.
 
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KULTULZ

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Again, cartridge filters have their purpose(s) and are sized according to need.
I think this whole argument is being confused by semantics.

A WHOLE HOUSE FILTER is any filter that is installed at the home's water supply point of entry and is used to filter any (not necessarily all) pollutants that the user wants to control. It can be a replaceable cartridge type, in in-out or a back flush design. The filtering system has to be designed to remove or control any impurities the owner desires.

A filter or system of filters is applicable to one home only (there ain't one fits all). Even municipal water impurities can vary from street to street.

Agreed, a sediment filter (or pre-filter) is not necessary. The carbon filter(s) will catch the sediments, particulates and turbicity and require the carbon filter(s) to be replaced more often. The sediment filter element is much cheaper than the carbon filter, but who is counting?

Active charcoal carbon filters are most effective at removing chlorine, sediment, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), taste and odor from water. They are not effective at removing minerals, salts, and dissolved inorganic compounds.

Typical particle sizes that can be removed by carbon filters range from 0.5 to 50 micrometres. The particle size will be used as part of the filter description. The efficacy of a carbon filter is also based upon the flow rate regulation. When the water is allowed to flow through the filter at a slower rate, the contaminants are exposed to the filter media for a longer amount of time.
SOURCE- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_filtering
 

speedbump

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The efficacy of a carbon filter is also based upon the flow rate regulation.
You just backed up my claim.These are not whole house filters because the flow rate would quite often exceed the filters rating. Besides that, look at the difference in the size of a POE filter v/s a POU. And I'm not talking about comparing what they say on the box the filter comes in.
 

KULTULZ

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You just backed up my claim.These are not whole house filters because the flow rate would quite often exceed the filters rating. Besides that, look at the difference in the size of a POE filter v/s a POU. And I'm not talking about comparing what they say on the box the filter comes in.
You took the statement out of context-

The efficacy (the ability to produce a desired or intended result) of a carbon filter is also based upon the flow rate regulation. When the water is allowed to flow through the filter at a slower rate, the contaminants are exposed to the filter media for a longer amount of time.
What is the average home flow rate, 10GPM? It (statements) is referring to how long the water is exposed to the filter media. If the water needs extra exposure (after testing) you use a larger bowl/element (20in) or a different media type cartridge.

All of this is determined firstly by a professional (lab) water analysis.

No use buying oversize equipment if not needed.
 

frodo

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to figure out what filter you need.

take a water sample to your local health department and have it tested

cost is a couple of bucks, they will give you a report, then you can get the correct filter for your needs

just buying a filter with out knowing if you need it is a waste of money
 

phishfood

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I would rather buy oversized equipment than buy undersized equipment.
 

KULTULZ

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But you guys are high rollers with good pay whereas the general population is not... ;)

Why go with a tank IN-OUT or back flush (with needed extra plumbing & electric) when not warranted, especially with supposedly treated municipal water?

Just wondering... :confused:
 

speedbump

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But you guys are high rollers with good pay whereas the general population is not...

Why go with a tank IN-OUT or back flush (with needed extra plumbing & electric) when not warranted, especially with supposedly treated municipal water?

Just wondering...
High rollers? I know many guys who worked on assembly lines who made more money, had far better health insurance (including dental and eye) and a fantastic retirement plan. Being self employed does not provide that luxury.

Why would you need any filter with supposedly treated municipal water??? It's already treated. Buy a softener to remove the hardness and be done with it.
 

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