What is this?

Discussion in 'Pumps and Wells' started by Chriztofor, Sep 13, 2018.

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  1. Sep 13, 2018 #1

    Chriztofor

    Chriztofor

    Chriztofor

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    IMG_20180912_234339.jpg IMG_20180912_210710.jpg Has anyone ever seen anything like this? Just bought this house, how old is this sump pump and what is the grey thing next to it? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Sep 13, 2018 #2

    Valveman

    Valveman

    Valveman

    Pump Controls Tech Professional

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    Looks like a pedestal pump. From the model number I would guess a 1962 model. They don't make them like that anymore. The grey thing to the left with the tee handle looks like some kind of grease gun. I would guess a turn of the handle will shoot some grease to the lower pump bearing.
     
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  3. Sep 13, 2018 #3

    FishScreener

    FishScreener

    FishScreener

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    It is the motor for a sewage ejector pump, which is located below it in the sump.

    Modern ejector pumps have the motor attached. The sewage in the tank, covers the submerged pump and motor assembly.

    The fact means that it is submerged in a water based effluent, means that it can’t get hot as easily. The water is better at transferring heat than the air.

    This allows a less robust motor to be used. Plus the exposed motor is lots easier to service when needed. And typically the motor is the more likely failure mode, than the pump itself going bad.

    Don’t let anyone flush diaper wipes down the toilet. They wreak havoc on the system, because the pumps are not made to grind the wipes, and the clog up the pump, eventually jamming it.

    The greaser could require a pumping stroke, or may be a spring loaded auto greaser. I can’t really tell from the picture.
     
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  4. Sep 14, 2018 #4

    Chriztofor

    Chriztofor

    Chriztofor

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    Thanks for the input guys! Want to know something weird and must be a coincidence. The sump pump stopped working, it was working but for some reason the water wasn't being removed from the can. A plumber came by and was stumped. He left and I remembered I turned off my spigot using a valve inside my house in the basement. When I replaced the spigot and turned on the valve the pump worked by pumping all the water out of the can and into the sewer. I know it doesn't make sense and they are separe systems but it worked! Note: I was able to flush toilets and take showers the pump was working but the can was not draining. How do I know it was pumping, the plumber removed a hose about 10 feet away and when he turned it on for a second water shot out like a fire hose. I'm just glad it's pumping and draining like normal again.

    Thanks for the responses!
    K
     
  5. Sep 14, 2018 #5

    FishScreener

    FishScreener

    FishScreener

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    There are some good videos on trouble shooting motors. It isn’t that hard, but it really would take a thousand words. So, I won’t even try.

    But, basically there are two floats.

    An upper one, which closes when the water level rises far enough that the pump needs to run. A relay closes and the pump runs.
    The lower float opens when the tank is drained, and unlocks the relay, stopping the pump.
     

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