What is this pvc part?

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Morey, Jan 17, 2018.

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  1. Jan 17, 2018 #1

    Morey

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    Heat bulb burned out last night so water in the well house froze and cracked the pvc. In the picture, I'm having trouble identifying the Pvc connectior between the spigot and the Tee coupler. Looks like a bushing on the bottom part. Anybody know what it is?

    20180117_113527_resized.jpg
     
  2. Jan 17, 2018 #2

    voletl

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  3. Jan 18, 2018 #3

    Morey

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  4. Jan 20, 2018 #4

    journeyman

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    Don't thread metal into plastic
     
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  5. Jan 21, 2018 #5

    Morey

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    Why not? What is the alternative? I had 2 different inspectors look at the well house and neither mentioned the metal threaded into pvc attachments.

    Thanks.
     
  6. Jan 22, 2018 #6

    journeyman

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    Because the metal will split the pvc always thread plastic into metal
     
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  7. Jan 27, 2018 #7

    thekinlossian

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    I agree; annoying though that they make fip x pvc fittings so that we can transition from steel pipe to plastic? Tough call really. I’ve done this often with no problem and have likewise split both brass and steel fittings! Guess I don’t know my own strength
     
  8. Jan 27, 2018 #8

    thekinlossian

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    I agree; annoying though that they make fip x pvc fittings so that we can transition from steel pipe to plastic? Tough call really. I’ve done this often with no problem and have likewise split both brass and steel fittings! Guess I don’t know my own strength :)
     
  9. Jan 27, 2018 #9

    journeyman

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    Pvc threads are not the same as copper threads that is why you have to be careful
     
  10. Jan 27, 2018 #10

    thekinlossian

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    Are you thinking durability, or is there an actual difference in pitch of thread, thread count or taper on the pipe? We do a lot of agricultural stuff up here where you have to accommodate a plethora for materials, ancient steel among them.
     
  11. Jan 27, 2018 #11

    Mr_David

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    One big dif is that plastic fittings are cast in a mold and metal ones are cut with a die.

    typically Plastic male fittings are screwed into metal female fittings.
    Pipe threads are tapered, and male fitting are like a wedge.
    The tighter you make the joint, the more outward pressure you exert on the female fitting.
    A plastic female fitting on a metal male is likely to fail 1st?

    The plastic male fitting will compress in the metal female
    Plastic male fitting also can and do fail.

    Their weakness is the valley of each thread.
    They always crack at the thread outside the joint.
    We try to always use Schedule 80 fittings.

    If you have to use a plastic female you can increase longevity by putting a hose clamp around the fitting
     
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