What is Pex R?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Products' started by hardwite, Mar 14, 2019.

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  1. Mar 14, 2019 #1

    hardwite

    hardwite

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    Nibco Pex-R (like a pirate would say). I am trying to determine where this falls in the A, B, C pex types. Does anyone know the quality of this material? Good, bad, ugly?

    I have a data sheet from Nibco - see screen shot; but cannot find any link on the Nibco site.

     
  2. Mar 15, 2019 #2

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Curious...where did you get this sheet?

    I searched their literature and couldn't find any reference to it. So I called the technical department and once he figured out that I was saying the letter "R" (I'm from the Boston area.) he said he didn't know.
    So I sent a copy via email with the question.

    Coincidentally, it is being used on a Recirculation loop.
    Maybe RED
     
  3. Mar 15, 2019 #3

    Mikey

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    Maybe it's got something to do with Radiant heat application?
     
  4. Mar 15, 2019 #4

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Just received an email back from Nipco. They said.....

    RE: Nibco PEX-R

    HI Tom

    I went and emailed one of our specialists for your request.
    The catalog from Nibco has nothing pertaining PEX-R anywhere
    Will let you know if he has any information

    Thank you


    Marian Burggraf

    NIBCO INC.| Technical Services Advisor

    burggrafm@nibco.com | www.nibco.com
     
  5. Mar 16, 2019 at 12:34 AM #5

    hardwite

    hardwite

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    Nibco sent the datasheet attached in the first posting. I followed up with a question regarding its comparison to type A, B, or C. Here is the response:

    It would be closest to PEX B, however it has a better chemical compatibility vs chlorinated water at higher temperatures than standard PEX B does.

    This tubing is used in a recirculation system in my house. I could see it being used in a radiant heating circuit, and it is colored red. Radiant heat tubing is typically white though (according to the all-knowing internet).

    Here is a link for pex types, but no R found on the net or at Nibco.
    https://www.pexuniverse.com/types-of-pex-tubing

    Other links also warn against using PEX-C.
     
  6. Mar 16, 2019 at 11:16 PM #6

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    That's a good write up of the differences in the 3 basic types. It would have been nice if they had included a little info or some reference to the variations, such as the Oxygen Barrier versions and the PEX-AL-PEX.
    They do carry them and do say this about them elsewhere.
    "Oxygen Barrier type PEX tubing is designed for use in
    closed-loop applications, including radiant heating and hydronic
    heating systems, which contain ferrous (cast iron) components,
    such as circulator pumps, radiators, boiler heating elements and
    others."

    Additionally, that the PEX-AL-PEX is, "Tested and Certified by NSF for potable water applications and complies with NSF/ANSI 61 standard."
     
  7. Mar 16, 2019 at 11:48 PM #7

    hardwite

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    I walked through another house today and saw the same PEX-R tubing, though in white, used for all of the plumbing (cold, hot, circulation loop). (I erred saying white is for radiant loops - I should have said orange; I don't think color matters anyhow).
     
  8. Mar 17, 2019 at 1:36 AM #8

    Diehard

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    Correct...color doesn't matter.
    I'm wondering why I haven't heard back from them on the PEX-R question.
    But it sounds like maybe the R is the correct type for potable water and which perhaps has that oxygen barrier. Every once in a while I'll spend some time researching it, but it gets confusing. I think I'll start making calls and writing emails to these company to satisfy my curiosity. And I'm not even a plumber but retired so I have the time.:D
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019 at 2:03 AM
  9. Mar 17, 2019 at 6:11 PM #9

    WyrTwister

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    when we replaced the water main to our house ( from meter in the alley to the house ) , I had read white was normally used for that purpose . Red was used for hot water and blue for cold water .

    My understanding is it is for identification only .

    I know nothing about hydronic heating .

    Wyr
    God bless
     
  10. Mar 20, 2019 at 1:07 AM #10

    hardwite

    hardwite

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    A response from Nibco to my question on how it is manufactured:

    This is PEX-B, ALL PEX-b has Silane as an additive which chemically promotes the cross linking. All PEX-b uses a steam bath (high temperature, high humidity) as a curing process to accelerate the cross linking.
    I suppose they tweak the process and add/remove some chemicals to get they chemical and chlorine capabilities they cite.
     
  11. Mar 20, 2019 at 1:33 AM #11

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    I got another response from the Technical Service Advisor. He pretty much said the same.

    "The “R” stands for recirculation. PEX-R is NIBCO’s brand name for PEX-b which is listed for up 100% recirculation time, 80psi at 140°F."

    So I sent him back a question for further clarication, as follows.

    "Any concern for ferrous materials within the recirc system vs. non-barrier type PEX?"

    Because, as you may have read, the reason they use Oxygen Barrier PEX is to protect any ferrous items, such as cast iron pumps, Boilers on hydronic system, etc from the rust causing oxygen that apparently can get through non-barrier versions.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2019 at 1:39 AM

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