wet vent or rough in?

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by handywannabe, Sep 8, 2012.

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  1. Sep 8, 2012 #1

    handywannabe

    handywannabe

    handywannabe

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    Looking for some advice to hopefuly
    save me some work...

    The 4” pipe stub seems pretty simple,
    drop a toilet on it.

    The 2” pipe in the rough-in I'm
    assuming would be for a sink or shower. Given the layout this is a
    bad spot for me and would like to put the sink (no shower) in the
    blue taped off area spelled out as 'area for sink'. I would rather
    not have to cut the concrete to use this 2” pipe if I can help it
    and that’s where I am looking for some advice.

    I've been told as long as the sink pipe
    size is smaller than the toilet vent I can wet vent the sink into the
    toilet vent. This would save me quiet a bit of work. If I can do
    this then my next could questions would be... which pipe is the
    correct one to connect to 1, 2, or 3? I'm assuming 1 but I'm not
    even sure what pipe 3 would be so I'm really not sure...

    If I can connect to one of the pipes
    what do I do with the pipe in the rough in? Can I just cap, bury,
    and forget? Will it get full of stagnant water and cause odors
    somewhere in the bathroom or would the roof vent handle that?

    Any thoughts and advice would be most appreciated!

    basement (2) (800x598).jpg
     
  2. Sep 8, 2012 #2

    Beni

    Beni

    Beni

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    What state are you in. Makes a difference from a code standpoint. Also is there any plumbing rough in on the other side of the wall

    My guess is pipe 3 is the vent for the shower/ tub drain (square in floor) In the southern states or most midwest states you could cut a tee into Pipe 2 or 3 and wet vent either the shower or water closet. In the west, You can connect to pipe 2 for a wet vent on the water closet. Tee inlet should be one size smaller then the vent pipe.

    I'm going to assume your in a western state as you have lots O vents..

    Yes on capping the 2" shower/tub drain in the floor. Done all the time.
     
  3. Sep 9, 2012 #3

    handywannabe

    handywannabe

    handywannabe

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    Thanks Beni, much appreciate the help!
     
  4. Sep 9, 2012 #4

    bhamiltonjr

    bhamiltonjr

    bhamiltonjr

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    Holy crap thats alot of Vents. Seems like they have everything individually vented.
     
  5. Sep 11, 2012 #5

    rednip1203

    rednip1203

    rednip1203

    Jason Pinder

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    Do you guys have to vent each appliance eg sink toilet? On the uk we just do this!!

    image-2345521726.jpg
     
  6. Sep 11, 2012 #6

    Beni

    Beni

    Beni

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    Some of the codes use to do that, The southern plumbing code used in the southeast US had a single stack vent allowed in it. Maybe one still does, but think it was taken out of the "new international codes". Also was allowed in some citys who had their own code. Most US codes did not allow a single stack waste & vent. Oddly enough it works well enough too. Theres also Solvent, but that's a bit different, though used it a lot in high rise construction..

    The west coast pretty much use to require separate vents for everything and most still do it that way. Though the latest code does allow wet venting to a limited degree
     
  7. Sep 11, 2012 #7

    rednip1203

    rednip1203

    rednip1203

    Jason Pinder

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    I do find the differences we have really interesting! You guys must have to remember loads with codes etc!!
     
  8. Sep 11, 2012 #8

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    Yes, I have seen some of the older homes plumbed as rednip shows. Since I have started in the trade here in Florida, though, I haven't seen a time where it was allowed. I started in apprenticeship school the same year that I started, 1994, and I know it wasn't allowed in the code then. Horizontal wet venting is allowed, and is the most common way to vent a bathroom group.
     
  9. Sep 11, 2012 #9

    rednip1203

    rednip1203

    rednip1203

    Jason Pinder

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    This I believe is a very very old way we used to install wast systems! The vent is in lead I believe! Some examples can be seen in the uk all pipes are mostly on the outside of the building.

    image-3991771897.jpg
     
  10. Sep 12, 2012 #10

    johnjh2o

    johnjh2o

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    That looks like it's even before my time.:D

    John
     
  11. Sep 12, 2012 #11

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    And that is saying something!;)
     
  12. Sep 12, 2012 #12

    Beni

    Beni

    Beni

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    Well in the 70's and 80's you could wet vent fixtures other then water closet and I think washer boxes on a single wet stack. Had some 4 story condo's at Ameilia Island, Fl. from about 1980 ish done that way. The wet stack was 2 sizes larger then the largest inlet. Going by memory as its been that long since I did that. Though think I did a few condos on hilton head in the 80's that way too

    The photo from the lead pipe day, well the venting is still done that way here, with a few minor changes due to closet trap design.
     
  13. Sep 12, 2012 #13

    phishfood

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    You can still wet vent on a vertical waste stack, called waste stack venting, under IPC. We do it all the time in apartment buildings, usually on kitchens and laundries.
     

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