Well pressure tops out at 68psi. How do I increase pressure?

Discussion in 'Pumps and Wells' started by chaseme5, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. Mar 11, 2012 #1

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    Hi,

    System is as follows:

    well 400ft.

    2 pumps one in the well, one on the surface for delivery of water to house.

    5000 gallon storage tank.

    2.5HP ITT Industries centrugal pump. Motor by baldor. (surface delivery pump).

    40 gal pressure tank.

    Lense microprocessor controlled motor drive unit.

    Densco transducer pressure switch. 0-160 psi.

    system is 9 years old.

    The problem is that we would like to increase the pressure at the house.

    Pressure at the house is around 55psi after all the filters. We would like to increase it but the surface pump seems to max out at 67-68psi.

    The house is about 350ft from the well. Can we increase the pressure to 72-75psi at the well? Is that possible? Is our pump wearing out?

    water quality:

    TDS: 1200
    ph 7.3
    Hardness 35 GPG
    Silica 49.7 mg/l

    TDS, hardness, silica is extremely hard on all of the equiptment.
     
  2. Mar 12, 2012 #2

    waterwelldude

    waterwelldude

    waterwelldude

    Water well,and septic guy Professional

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    If the pressure is around 68 at the tank, I would stop there.
    The pressure reading you get at the house you say is after the filters. Is that reading when the water is running or with everything off and no one is using water?
    The filters will slow down the amount of flow you get at the house if water is being used, thus, reduced pressure.
     
  3. Mar 12, 2012 #3

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    The reading is when nothing is running. The pressure at the pump changes from 50-65 psi. The pump does not turn on until the pressure drops below 50. I would like the pressure to be a bit higher. If I set the upper limit to 68 psi the pump might not turn off so that is why I lowered it to 65. I have a 1 micron filter that contributes to the pressure drop, as well as a water softener. The pressure at the house is at a range, it does not hold steady at one number. It fluxuates.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012
  4. Mar 13, 2012 #4

    Valveman

    Valveman

    Valveman

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    I would need the model number of the pump to be sure, but the only 2.5 HP I see will max out at about 65 PSI. Probably 67-68 with flooded suction as when pumping from an above ground tank. So if it is maxed out at 67 PSI, it is not pumping any water. The more water you use, the lower the pressure the pump can build. At 50 PSI, that pump can put out about 40 GPM.

    If you want more pressure, you will have to get a pump that will produce more pressure and less gallons. Either a multistage centrifugal pump or a submersible placed inside the storage tank will give you more pressure.
     
  5. Mar 13, 2012 #5

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    Yes you are correct. When the pump is maxed out it is not pumping any water. However if water is being used out of a couple lines it is still able to build pressure. For example if it is at 40 psi it can bulid to 65 psi with water being pumped to the house. If the sprinklers are used it can not build pressure but it can hold pressure.

    I will try to get a model number for the pump.


    The identification tag is not readable on the pump anymore. However I did find a servive call reciept with this info

    Goulds HSC20 multistage booster pump.
    AC TECH M220S-251 Varible Frequency Drive, 2HP,230V
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
  6. Mar 14, 2012 #6

    Valveman

    Valveman

    Valveman

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    The curve for that pump shows it can build 90 PSI, and will produce 20 GPM at 77 PSI. So I would say your problem is with the VFD. There are many things that can be set wrong or just not working right with a VFD. You would be much better off with a 60/80 pressure switch and a CSV.
     
  7. Mar 17, 2012 #7

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    This is going to take some time to figure out. Thanks for the info.
     
  8. Mar 17, 2012 #8

    speedbump

    speedbump

    speedbump

    Wells & pumps; not a... Professional

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    You would be better off using a flow switch to actuate that pump instead of any other type of controller. At 1 gallon per minute the flow switch turns on the pump and keeps it at it's max against how ever much water your using. This way you don't have to wait for the lower pressure setting for the pump to come on. They are a bunch less money than a transducer also.
     
  9. Mar 18, 2012 #9

    Driller1

    Driller1

    Driller1

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    I love the VFD systems however, they are not for a non professional in many cases.

    Call a local pump professional to help you out.:):):cool:
     
  10. Mar 18, 2012 #10

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    We called our local pump company and found out they retired. Sold business. All their numbers have been disconnected.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2012
  11. Mar 18, 2012 #11

    Driller1

    Driller1

    Driller1

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    Bummer.......

    Still I would call around.

    Try asking at you local health department......maybe they know some one.
     
  12. Mar 19, 2012 #12

    Valveman

    Valveman

    Valveman

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    Probably went out of business because they were selling VFD systems.
     
  13. Mar 19, 2012 #13

    Driller1

    Driller1

    Driller1

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    Do you have poof of that????

    I sell SQE systems and I will never go out of business until we retire.

    Funny thing about the systems....installers either love them or, hate them.

    Good thing there is work for both schools of thought!!!!!
     
  14. Mar 26, 2012 #14

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    To be honest the cost of service was way to high. What is a fair price to replace a pressure tranducer for a VFD system? There are manufactures that offer 10 year warranties on their pressure tranducers. However tranducers that were used that do not offer a warranty. Or if there was a warranty the customer was never notified of it. So you would have to buy the part again when infact it should be replaced under warranty. Customers want piece of mind and reliability.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  15. Mar 26, 2012 #15

    Driller1

    Driller1

    Driller1

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    We give a 5 year top to bottom on all wells and pump systems.
     
  16. Mar 26, 2012 #16

    chaseme5

    chaseme5

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    The other issue is that these wells need service. A float that might go bad or a galv steel pipe that is old and rusted could cause a catastrophic failure. Well companies should have a service interval. Just like cars do. Car manufactures have a level one service and a level two service at a set amount of miles. Hour meters shoud be a part of these well systems. The well company should have emails or letters sent out to it's customers for recomended inspection and service. This should include basic water testing. That is what I recommend. Yearly service is cheap compared to costly failures.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  17. Mar 26, 2012 #17

    speedbump

    speedbump

    speedbump

    Wells & pumps; not a... Professional

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    How much would you be willing to pay me to come out every six months and inspect your system?

    I sent out cards to all my customer base years ago. It was well over 1000 people. The cards suggested a yearly or by yearly service for a specified amount. I got zero replies.

    People take their water for granted and aren't willing to spend one red cent until the faucets dry up. Then it's a major emergency.
     
  18. Mar 27, 2012 #18

    Driller1

    Driller1

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    Most of the time a well and pumping systems is either working well or, not at all.

    At least the newer systems.

    Once I had a customer have me check things out because their sister was going to rent their home for a year.

    Everything was fine.

    Two months later we pulled the pump.

    I think it was a power surge.
     

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