water tank venting power vent

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contact148

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I have a natural draft tank its dying so I bought a power vent tank which I will install but I have a venting question I have very limited options for where the exhaust will have to go through the wall see pic

I planned on putting it either directly right of my furnace exhaust or to the left of my gas meter Now my gas meter is vented about 12 feet down the wall so I am clear of the meter venting. I made green marks on the brick for approx location I want to run it I plan on extending it up 1 foot to clear the furnace intake

 

Twowaxhack

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because the gas meter is vented 12 ft away its not a problem ac is almost 2ft away
Are you speaking of the gas companies regulator ? Is that whats vented 12’ away ?

Wouldn’t matter here, they don’t like for gas meters to be within 36” horizontally of any electrical box.

Your supplier may not follow the same protocol.
 

contact148

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here they only care about the regulator vent terminus you must be 3 ft away from it mine was moved by the gas company when I had my direct vent furnace installed
 

Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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Here's a question for you, @contact148. Why are you converting to a [more costly] power vent heater? If you already have a conventional vent unit, presumably you already have the requisite venting and chimney etc. and thus installing the same kind is a bit easier.

I had a power vent (three of them actually) over the 27 year ownership of my home in Michigan. The builders chose them because it was a neater, cleaner installation of running PVC vent pipe out a wall during the initial build, than running B-Vent from the basement passing through the first floor, second floor and finally the attic prior to penetrating the roof. You can't vent a gas appliance into a chimney used for a fireplace so the power vent made the most sense. Unless you are not telling us something the most sense is simply another conventional vent water heater.

...and for those wondering why the builders didn't just go up to a wall on the first floor, stick a vent pipe out there...well it wasn't that kind of neighborhood. That kind of install looks like %$#@. There were a few builders that did indeed vent from the basement up through the roof for the water heater, but those with half a brain simply put in a power vent water heater.
 

PerplexedPlumber

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I can't see how tall that wall is, but if this is a single-story wall, I also wondered why not go up the wall and use a wall vent cap. For a similar application, to improve the exterior appearance, we were able to use one like this: R2 Heavy Duty Wall Exhaust / Intake Hood by removing the damper and sealing the area outside the pipe to the inside of the vent cap with expandable spray foam. We painted it to match. The end of the pipe must be completely unobstructed (no mesh to keep birds out that can lead to frost build-up) and at least 2" diameter.
 

Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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...why not go up the wall and use a wall vent cap...
...because gas fired appliances typically have to vent vertically in order to get a proper draft and prevent hazardous back drafting. In the case of a gas fired water heater, the only ones suitable for "horizontal venting" would be a power vent model using PVC, and a direct vent model which typically uses a concentric vent and also takes in outside air for combustion. Those water heaters so certified as direct vent are noted on the label on the water heater itself and on the instruction/install/users manual.

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we were able to use one like this: R2 Heavy Duty Wall Exhaust / Intake Hood by removing the damper
While you may have modified that R2 piece noted above, "jerry rigged" is more the description, I'm afraid. It's not a vent for a gas appliance, it's an exhaust hood for a kitchen or bath fan. It's not B-vent, and passing single wall gas venting through a wall isn't advised; it's not safe because it doesn't allow for the clearances required. Also, if the gas water heater you were venting isn't clearly marked "direct vent" it's a no-go. Lastly, direct vent hoods (which may LOOK similar) are stamped HOT...and this is not. If you don't follow the manufacturer's venting, well...

One thing that every installation manual for any kind of gas appliance (gas fireplace, gas heater, water heater, furnace or whatever) will have is an extensive section on ventilation options. Maybe there's a page on connecting the gas, maybe a page on mechanical and physical installation, maybe a few paragraphs on electrical connections, and then there'll be 20 pages on venting...

People die from CO poisoning every year, so these guidelines are pretty important.
 

PerplexedPlumber

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Michell, I appreciate your attention to details on the points related to installing a power vent.

The exhaust hood that I referred to is non-functional, as I said "for exterior appearance", with the damper removed - better than looking at a pipe sticking through a wall. Are you saying that you feel that it is unsafe to run the exhaust pipe up and through a wall enclosure?
 

Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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It's really quite simple. Follow the manufacturer's guidelines for venting any gas appliance.

The only gas water heaters suitable for a horizontal venting (through the wall) as you indicate, are either POWER VENT or DIRECT VENT models. Power vent models are pretty easy to note by just looking at them; there's a [big] blower on top. DIRECT VENT models are noted on the tag. So, heck yeah it's unsafe to run the exhaust pipe up and through the wall, absolutely unsafe unless it's a direct vent model.

If you do indeed have a DIRECT VENT model, and go through a wall, you still need to use and follow the manufacturer's guidelines...guaranteed they won't include a modified kitchen/bath exhaust vent.


The problem with gas appliances not properly vented, as I already mentioned, is the possibility of backdrafting, incomplete combustion or other situations causing CO to build up in the living space. CO is odorless. It can and does kill people every year.
 

PerplexedPlumber

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I'm not sure you understood what I said. We are talking about a power vent for a water heater. When the vent goes through a wall (again, for a power vent, and of course following the manufacturers instructions), do you feel there is a safety issue with using the housing of the wall vent cover over the exhaust pipe for appearance purposes? (and again, not interfering with the exhaust pipe in any way)
 

Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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No of course not but you did not indicate that you were dealing with a power vent water heater. The talk was about somebody with a conventional water heater.

I would still follow the manufacturers recommendations only.
 

JG plumbing

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I'm not sure you understood what I said. We are talking about a power vent for a water heater. When the vent goes through a wall (again, for a power vent, and of course following the manufacturers instructions), do you feel there is a safety issue with using the housing of the wall vent cover over the exhaust pipe for appearance purposes? (and again, not interfering with the exhaust pipe in any way)
I was following you. I think diy guy is eager to help.
 

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