Vibration from water well pump - Water Pump Switch as cause?

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bbp

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Could it be the pressure tank?
It looks as though you only isolated the switch from the main feed. What you need to do is cut out a section of the 3/4" copper ABOVE all that and isolate all pump components from the house plumbing.
Thats my.02 worth.
 

Jeff Handy

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Put in one flex section below the pressure gauge.
And another flex above the ball valve.
 

Jeff Handy

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You can use Sharkbite flex lines and Sharkbite fittings.
Or just use compression fittings on the copper, to add male or female adapters as needed.

Be sure to use flex hoses the same diameter as the copper lines, or even one size up
 

Bucky Plumber

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You can use Sharkbite flex lines and Sharkbite fittings.
Or just use compression fittings on the copper, to add male or female adapters as needed.

Be sure to use flex hoses the same diameter as the copper lines, or even one size up
The biggest Sharkbite diameter I can find that they make is 3/4".

 

Bucky Plumber

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@Twowaxhack

Very interesting and thorough article but I dont think my setup has either of those problems. Definitely doesn't short cycle and it doesn't seem to have pressure switch chatter. The switch kicks on and runs consistently, with a vibration/hum from somewhere in the system, until it reaches 60 psi.
 

Valveman

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@Twowaxhack

Very interesting and thorough article but I dont think my setup has either of those problems. Definitely doesn't short cycle and it doesn't seem to have pressure switch chatter. The switch kicks on and runs consistently, with a vibration/hum from somewhere in the system, until it reaches 60 psi.
I hear this all the time. "My pump doesn't rapid cycle. I only hear it click every 5 minutes or so when using water." Well there are 1440 minutes in a day and a cycle every 5 minutes can be almost 300 cycles per day. This will kill a pump but when standing there listening to it the thing doesn't sound like it is cycling very often. Cycling every 5 minutes adds up quickly. And if it cycles every 2 minutes is is even worse. Any damage done to the pump/motor that could be causing the noise was probably also caused by cycling the pump.
 

Bucky Plumber

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UPDATE....

I am still trying to avoid cutting the main 1" copper supply line to the house so my next step was to isolate the water pressure tank with a flexible line, to eliminate that as the possible source of the vibration. See below for pictures.

Once again I thought this was the fix. After I put the flexible line in to the pressure tank I turned the pump switch back on and the pressure tank filled up completely silent, no vibration at all. Then I opened the ball valve shutoff to the rest of the house. The next time the pump switched on the vibration was back.

I think I have asked this before but could it be the source of the vibration be this Watt's ball valve shutoff? (It has to be this or something else down the line from, cant imagine what else it could be)

I guess my next step is cutting into the main supply line to the house and installing a flexible hose. I would rather avoid this and replace/repair whatever the source of the vibration is.

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20210707_184242.jpg
 

RS

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The flexible line you installed still looks like metal, and metal transmits vibration. I would cut the coper supply line as far back as you can and replace it with a rubber hose, they make hose that will easily withstand the pressure. I can faintly hear our pump when it's running, the well is only about 20 feet from the house. My wife can't hear it, so then it's not a problem!
 

Bucky Plumber

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The flexible line you installed still looks like metal, and metal transmits vibration. I would cut the coper supply line as far back as you can and replace it with a rubber hose, they make hose that will easily withstand the pressure. I can faintly hear our pump when it's running, the well is only about 20 feet from the house. My wife can't hear it, so then it's not a problem!
Do you have pictures?

It makes me nervous putting something in the water supply line that isn't metal or steel braided.
 

Jeff Handy

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You can get short flex supply lines with threaded fittings.
The water line inside is flex pvc, the support jacket outside is braided stainless or pvc.
These flex supplies are used on water heaters, softeners, well tanks, filtration etc.
 

RS

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We have had well systems for almost 50 years with submersible pumps, that develop 60 psi, and have always used 100 psi black plastic water line, and never had a problem. How old is your pump? Possibly it is failing, that's where the vibration is coming from.
 

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UPDATE....

I am still trying to avoid cutting the main 1" copper supply line to the house so my next step was to isolate the water pressure tank with a flexible line, to eliminate that as the possible source of the vibration. See below for pictures.

Once again I thought this was the fix. After I put the flexible line in to the pressure tank I turned the pump switch back on and the pressure tank filled up completely silent, no vibration at all. Then I opened the ball valve shutoff to the rest of the house. The next time the pump switched on the vibration was back.

I think I have asked this before but could it be the source of the vibration be this Watt's ball valve shutoff? (It has to be this or something else down the line from, cant imagine what else it could be)

I guess my next step is cutting into the main supply line to the house and installing a flexible hose. I would rather avoid this and replace/repair whatever the source of the vibration is.

View attachment 30433
View attachment 30434
View attachment 30435
The ball valve is also called an isolation valve because it isolates your pump system from the house. If the problem only exist when the isolation valve is open, the problem is happening after the ball valve somewhere. Leave a shower and faucet open while opening and closing the ball valve to start and stop the pump. If there is no noise, the problem part is after the ball valve.
 

Bucky Plumber

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You can get short flex supply lines with threaded fittings.
The water line inside is flex pvc, the support jacket outside is braided stainless or pvc.
These flex supplies are used on water heaters, softeners, well tanks, filtration etc.
I am having a hard time finding 1 inch FIP flexible PCV/braided jacket. It seems like at 1 inch the only option is corrugated stainless steel like I have in the pictures.
 

Bucky Plumber

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We have had well systems for almost 50 years with submersible pumps, that develop 60 psi, and have always used 100 psi black plastic water line, and never had a problem. How old is your pump? Possibly it is failing, that's where the vibration is coming from.
The pump is getting older, 18 years. When I go to the pump head outside and the pump runs I cannot hear any vibration which makes me think the origin of the vibration is somewhere in the house.
 

Valveman

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The pump is getting older, 18 years. When I go to the pump head outside and the pump runs I cannot hear any vibration which makes me think the origin of the vibration is somewhere in the house.
I agree. It is going to be a leaky toilet valve or something in the house.
 

Jeff Handy

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Go to a supply house.
Buy a foot or two of 1.5 inch pex, and fittings to splice into your line.
Because the fittings have a smaller ID than the pipe.
Sharkbite type, or rent or borrow tools for pex couplings.
Change all your exposed existing well pipe hangers to ones that let the pipe move, or buy new oversized hangers and just pad out the pipe with Gorilla tape.
This will reduce transmitted vibration to your house framing.
 

Bucky Plumber

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I agree. It is going to be a leaky toilet valve or something in the house.
I tried this with the outside hose running and turning all the valves I could find in the house off.
Didn't seem to make any difference. When the pump kicked on I turned the ball valve back and forth with little change in the vibration pattern.
When I had the ball valve closed and it was not making any vibration was right after I was working on the system (turned pump off and drained water).
What effect would a leaky valve in the house have on vibration of the well pump?
 
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