Unknown fitting

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Kstranberg

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Hello,

I've got a floor drain in my basement that has a plug on the sewer side. House was built in the 70's. The plug is female and requires some sort of male socket to undo. The shape is square and with a micrometer measures just over .9 inches (I'm thinking 7/8 inches?) Does anyone know what tool I need to undo this? Thanks for your input! Also, I'm trying to remove this because the floor drain is very slow. Any recommendation on improving the flow of the drain. No signs of sewer backups, just the floor drain is slow.

PXL_20201225_174441424.jpg
 

Kstranberg

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Thank you for your reply. I actually bought that tool a few years back and for some reason it doesn't fit my plug. The .73 inch end is too small and the .93 end is just a hair to large. My micrometer is reading .9. Yesterday I stuck a long screw driver down the drain and felt a lot of gravely type sediment. I took a shop vac and got some of it out but couldn't get it all. It is certainly draining a little better but I fear it will quickly clog again as I still feel a lot loose material. Would a professional be able to remove the rest of that material or is there a trick to doing it myself? I also exposed a small hole 3/4's the way up the side of the drain that appears to be a vent of some sort? I'm assuming uncovering that it also helping with the draining.
 

Jeff Handy

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The hole in the side of the drain might just be a failure from rusting out.
Water could flow through there, and could escape into the gravel under the slab.
Can you show that better in a picture?

That floor drain looks corroded AF.

It might need busting out and replacing, and a new p trap.

Spraying some penetrating oil like PB Blaster on the clean out threads and repeating, then waiting overnight, might help to unscrew it.

Floor drains tend to get used as a garbage can.
Junk gets into there during construction, or from floor sweeping, or floats into there during basement floods.

I once vacuumed out two broken beer bottles mixed with dozens of wire nuts and screws.
 

Kstranberg

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The hole in the side of the drain might just be a failure from rusting out.
Water could flow through there, and could escape into the gravel under the slab.
Can you show that better in a picture?

That floor drain looks corroded AF.

It might need busting out and replacing, and a new p trap.

Spraying some penetrating oil like PB Blaster on the clean out threads and repeating, then waiting overnight, might help to unscrew it.

Floor drains tend to get used as a garbage can.
Junk gets into there during construction, or from floor sweeping, or floats into there during basement floods.

I once vacuumed out two broken beer bottles mixed with dozens of wire nuts and screws.
Great idea on the angle grinder. Might try something like that. I only have a oscillating dremel but might work for the side of the job. I'll post a picture of the hole in a minute. It looks too perfect to be corrosion. Maybe a hole that was drilled after the fact by a previous home owner? The basement did flood once back in the 80's due to a leaking water tower that sits above the house on a hill. Might explain the current condition of the trap now. I've sprayed the plug several times with pb blaster to get it ready for removal. Just need a tool to remove it now. Worked great on a screw that was rusted onto the drain which held the old drain cover on. That stuff is impressive!
 

Jeff Handy

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That hole looks like it might have once been threaded.
Maybe pros on here will know its purpose.
 
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