True sizes for ABS and PVC pipes

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Zanne

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ChartSch40PVC.png ChartABSdrainage.png This is just a general guide. Actual pipe sizes may vary by manufacturer, but this should give a general idea of how large a hole needs to be drilled, what will fit, and help determine what pipe size you are dealing with if you can't find any markings.

Always remember to check your local jurisdictions for the trap arm lengths because sometimes they may differ from the standard IPC/UPC. Some places have a 72" limit for the 2" pipe, and larger pipes that are sloped at 1/4" per foot instead of 1/8" will have shorter runs.
The developed trap arm length can not exceed one pipe diameter because it will block air flow and create a vacuum.

Sources for the information are listed in post #4.
View attachment 17383 View attachment 17384chartSch40CPVC.png

And here is a PEX sizing chart....
PEXsizesgraph1.png
 
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Angie

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Wow, that is awesome. Thanks.
 

Zanne

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Thanks, Havasu! I would like to add that the sources for the information are Petersen Products https://www.petersenproducts.com/PVC-s/1986.htm for the PVC chart (which contains more information about the PVC-- including temperature tolerance ranges, wall thickness, larger pipe sizes, pressure tolerance, etc).

ABS info came from The Engineering Toolbox https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ABS-drainage-pipe-d_1732.html

UPC and IPC came from googling the codes and I would like to have a disclaimer that some jurisdictions may have local codes that supersede those rules, so it is always best to check. I do know that some places that use IPC have a limit of 6' instead of 8' for the 2" lines and that the developed length will have to be shorter if one uses 1/4" slope instead of 1/8" slope for the larger pipes. I want to add that the total developed length of the trap arm MUST be less than the nominal diameter of the pipe when sloped.

I'm thinking of doing a CPVC chart for water supply lines; It has the same outer diameter as PVC but a different inner diameter. I believe CPVC has thicker walls than PVC according to this site https://www.professionalplastics.com/professionalplastics/CPVCPipeSizesandSpecifications.pdf

I can try to convert that to the same type of chart if people don't want to load a .pdf

Editing because I forgot to mention that to find the wall thickness, subtract ID from OD. If you want to know the nominal OD of the female ends of the pipes (basically the part where it flares to allow another pipe to be inserted) you can add the wall thickness to the outer diameter to get an approximation to know how big of a hole to drill.

Editing again because I updated with a chart for CPVC. The PDF from Professional Plastics still has more pipe sizes and additional useful information.
 
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Diehard

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When I was trying to speculate, in my mind, as to why, I was thinking that the air break won't stop any fumes from entering the sink drain. Hence the added trap at the sink as well.
Purely speculation on that guys thinking. Whether it's really necessary, is another question.o_O
 

Chris Jackson

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View attachment 18998 View attachment 18999 This is just a general guide. Actual pipe sizes may vary by manufacturer, but this should give a general idea of how large a hole needs to be drilled, what will fit, and help determine what pipe size you are dealing with if you can't find any markings.

Always remember to check your local jurisdictions for the trap arm lengths because sometimes they may differ from the standard IPC/UPC. Some places have a 72" limit for the 2" pipe, and larger pipes that are sloped at 1/4" per foot instead of 1/8" will have shorter runs.
The developed trap arm length can not exceed one pipe diameter because it will block air flow and create a vacuum.

Sources for the information are listed in post #4.
View attachment 17383 View attachment 17384View attachment 17408

Thanks Zanne for your chart, Keep posted!
 

Zanne

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I decided to use the information from https://www.pexuniverse.com/pex-tubing-technical-specs to update this thread with PEX sizes. I included ID, OD, wall thickness, bending radius, and bending diameter so people can use that info to figure out how much length they need to bend at a 90 degree or 180 degree angle.
PEXsizesgraph1.png
 
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