True sizes for ABS and PVC pipes

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Zanne

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ChartSch40PVC.png ChartABSdrainage.png This is just a general guide. Actual pipe sizes may vary by manufacturer, but this should give a general idea of how large a hole needs to be drilled, what will fit, and help determine what pipe size you are dealing with if you can't find any markings.

Always remember to check your local jurisdictions for the trap arm lengths because sometimes they may differ from the standard IPC/UPC. Some places have a 72" limit for the 2" pipe, and larger pipes that are sloped at 1/4" per foot instead of 1/8" will have shorter runs.
The developed trap arm length can not exceed one pipe diameter because it will block air flow and create a vacuum.

Sources for the information are listed in post #4.
View attachment 17383 View attachment 17384chartSch40CPVC.png

And here is a PEX sizing chart....
PEXsizesgraph1.png
 
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Angie

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Wow, that is awesome. Thanks.
 

Zanne

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Thanks, Havasu! I would like to add that the sources for the information are Petersen Products https://www.petersenproducts.com/PVC-s/1986.htm for the PVC chart (which contains more information about the PVC-- including temperature tolerance ranges, wall thickness, larger pipe sizes, pressure tolerance, etc).

ABS info came from The Engineering Toolbox https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ABS-drainage-pipe-d_1732.html

UPC and IPC came from googling the codes and I would like to have a disclaimer that some jurisdictions may have local codes that supersede those rules, so it is always best to check. I do know that some places that use IPC have a limit of 6' instead of 8' for the 2" lines and that the developed length will have to be shorter if one uses 1/4" slope instead of 1/8" slope for the larger pipes. I want to add that the total developed length of the trap arm MUST be less than the nominal diameter of the pipe when sloped.

I'm thinking of doing a CPVC chart for water supply lines; It has the same outer diameter as PVC but a different inner diameter. I believe CPVC has thicker walls than PVC according to this site https://www.professionalplastics.com/professionalplastics/CPVCPipeSizesandSpecifications.pdf

I can try to convert that to the same type of chart if people don't want to load a .pdf

Editing because I forgot to mention that to find the wall thickness, subtract ID from OD. If you want to know the nominal OD of the female ends of the pipes (basically the part where it flares to allow another pipe to be inserted) you can add the wall thickness to the outer diameter to get an approximation to know how big of a hole to drill.

Editing again because I updated with a chart for CPVC. The PDF from Professional Plastics still has more pipe sizes and additional useful information.
 
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Diehard

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When I was trying to speculate, in my mind, as to why, I was thinking that the air break won't stop any fumes from entering the sink drain. Hence the added trap at the sink as well.
Purely speculation on that guys thinking. Whether it's really necessary, is another question.o_O
 

Chris Jackson

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View attachment 18998 View attachment 18999 This is just a general guide. Actual pipe sizes may vary by manufacturer, but this should give a general idea of how large a hole needs to be drilled, what will fit, and help determine what pipe size you are dealing with if you can't find any markings.

Always remember to check your local jurisdictions for the trap arm lengths because sometimes they may differ from the standard IPC/UPC. Some places have a 72" limit for the 2" pipe, and larger pipes that are sloped at 1/4" per foot instead of 1/8" will have shorter runs.
The developed trap arm length can not exceed one pipe diameter because it will block air flow and create a vacuum.

Sources for the information are listed in post #4.
View attachment 17383 View attachment 17384View attachment 17408

Thanks Zanne for your chart, Keep posted!
 

Zanne

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I decided to use the information from https://www.pexuniverse.com/pex-tubing-technical-specs to update this thread with PEX sizes. I included ID, OD, wall thickness, bending radius, and bending diameter so people can use that info to figure out how much length they need to bend at a 90 degree or 180 degree angle.
PEXsizesgraph1.png
 

Stuts

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View attachment 18998 View attachment 18999 This is just a general guide. Actual pipe sizes may vary by manufacturer, but this should give a general idea of how large a hole needs to be drilled, what will fit, and help determine what pipe size you are dealing with if you can't find any markings.

Always remember to check your local jurisdictions for the trap arm lengths because sometimes they may differ from the standard IPC/UPC. Some places have a 72" limit for the 2" pipe, and larger pipes that are sloped at 1/4" per foot instead of 1/8" will have shorter runs.
The developed trap arm length can not exceed one pipe diameter because it will block air flow and create a vacuum.

Sources for the information are listed in post #4.
View attachment 17383 View attachment 17384View attachment 17408

And here is a PEX sizing chart....
View attachment 23499
 

Stuts

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I decided to use the information from PEX tubing technical specifications and general installation practices to update this thread with PEX sizes. I included ID, OD, wall thickness, bending radius, and bending diameter so people can use that info to figure out how much length they need to bend at a 90 degree or 180 degree angle.
View attachment 23497
So, here is a question; I have a black, I am guessing HDPE pipe/tube for my water service, installed in 1971/72. It is 1 3/8 ID (1.375”) and 1.900” OD., which is 1 1/2” iron pipe OD. I need to now adapt it to a 1 1/2” NPT pipe. I can find no reference to what it is nor fittings for it. I can mix and match Ford Meter Box parts is all I can figure out. Any idea what this is? I don’t want to dig up 500 ft. of driveway to replace it. This is Los Angeles County.
 

Twowaxhack

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If I have to make a bend less than a couple feet, I use a 90 most of the time.

I’ve found many leaks on most likely damaged pex systems and a majority of these leaks show up in a bend in the pipe.

In systems that’s the only place it’s leaked.....
 

Zanne

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@Stuts, if it is HDPE it sounds like you have the 50mm nominal size. It has the same outer dimension as 1-1/2" schedule 40 CPVC but a different inner dimension (obviously).
What type of pipe do you want to bridge it to? PEX, CPVC, PVC, copper, or something else? I can look up what fittings are needed, but it sounds like you will need something that fits over the outside rather than inside, but I could be mistaken. I am not familiar with HDPE.

There were some charts at polyethylene pipe sizes | hdpe pipe sizes and dimensions | hdpe pipe sizes and classes | hdpe pipe sizes in mm and inches
but they were too small for me to read.

I found this site in my search: HDPE Transition Fittings - HDPE Fittings - Integrity Fusion

My apologies to admins if an of these links are not allowed.

@Twowaxhack I found that using pvc conduit long sweep elbow 90 fittings one pipe size larger than the PEX is a cheap and easy way to bend it without getting kinks or having to reduce flow to splice to a pex elbow or pay for one of the $4 or more bending clips.
 

Zanne

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DustinSanphy

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Thanks, Havasu! I would like to add that the sources for the information are Petersen Products PVC for the PVC chart (which contains more information about the PVC-- including temperature tolerance ranges, wall thickness, larger pipe sizes, pressure tolerance, etc).

ABS info came from The Engineering Toolbox ASTM D2661 - Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) Schedule 40 Plastic Drain, Waste, and Vent Pipe and Fittings

UPC and IPC came from googling the codes and I would like to have a disclaimer that some jurisdictions may have local codes that supersede those rules, so it is always best to check. I do know that some places that use IPC have a limit of 6' instead of 8' for the 2" lines and that the developed length will have to be shorter if one uses 1/4" slope instead of 1/8" slope for the larger pipes. I want to add that the total developed length of the trap arm MUST be less than the nominal diameter of the pipe when sloped.

I'm thinking of doing a CPVC chart for water supply lines; It has the same outer diameter as PVC but a different inner diameter. I believe CPVC has thicker walls than PVC according to this site https://www.professionalplastics.com/professionalplastics/CPVCPipeSizesandSpecifications.pdf

I can try to convert that to the same type of chart if people don't want to load a .pdf

Editing because I forgot to mention that to find the wall thickness, subtract ID from OD. If you want to know the nominal OD of the female ends of the pipes (basically the part where it flares to allow another pipe to be inserted) you can add the wall thickness to the outer diameter to get an approximation to know how big of a hole to drill.

Editing again because I updated with a chart for CPVC. The PDF from Professional Plastics still has more pipe sizes and additional useful information.
I need to see if they have a chart with take off measurements for abs and pvc DWV
 

Zanne

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I have a charts on PVC and ABS in the first post. Are you looking for different sizes not listed there?

Is there a difference between sch 40 and DWV PVC?
 
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