Toilet Clog Question

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by ArtNJ, Jun 13, 2018.

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  1. Jun 13, 2018 #1

    ArtNJ

    ArtNJ

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    Used a quality plunger, used a snake, no dice. Something I don't understand happened with the bell plunger...some water came up through the drain in the shower, which is just a couple of feet from the toilet. I don't understand what this means.

    Any help would be much appreciated
     
  2. Jun 13, 2018 #2

    justin_dewan90

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    Sewers more than likely clogged. Think of your drainage system like a tree. Sewer being the trunk. Everything else are branches that eventually tie to said trunk. All lead to the same place. And it's coming up the lowest point.
     
  3. Jun 13, 2018 #3

    ArtNJ

    ArtNJ

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    Ah that would make extra sense since this toilet is in my basement, right?

    I guess I need to figure out who to call in my town. We don't really use the basement toilet or shower much, but I guess there is a risk of further backup to the main level yeah?

    Thx for your help.
     
  4. Jun 13, 2018 #4

    ArtNJ

    ArtNJ

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    Actually, on trying to educate myself a bit more, since its a basement toilet and shower, its probably the sewage pump right? I didn't even know what a sewage pump was 20 minutes go, much less that I had one.

    Only thing still puzzling me is that the toilet does seem to slow eventually drain after trying to flush it. It was only when I plunged that I got flow out of the shower drain.
     
  5. Jun 13, 2018 #5

    justin_dewan90

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    Probably filling the ejector pit. Do you have a bypass switch? Meaning, is there a plug inside a plug for the ejector.
     
  6. Jun 13, 2018 #6

    justin_dewan90

    justin_dewan90

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    There's also, usually a hole where the plug comes through the pit lid. You can pull that up and see if the pit is full. Make sure you get it back in place afterwards and throw a little silicone around it. Could make your house smell.
     
  7. Jun 13, 2018 #7

    ArtNJ

    ArtNJ

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    Thanks for the help Justin, yes there is a float switch, with two cords coming out of the pump, one plugged into the other. I read on the internet to plug them in separately and see if the pump comes on. It did not come on, and the circuit breaker board is fine, so the pump is probably bad, not the switch. And yes, the pit seems to be full...in fact I have some leakage from the pit at the moment from trying to flush too many times I guess.

    I guess its time to call a plumber...don't think I'm competent to replace the pump. At least now I know what the issue is thanks to you, much obliged.
     
  8. Jun 13, 2018 #8

    justin_dewan90

    justin_dewan90

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    By separately, you mean one at a time right? Don't have them plugged in at the same time.
     
  9. Jun 13, 2018 #9

    ArtNJ

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    Correct. I head an electrical hum from the pump when the pump was plugged in with or without the switch (and obviously no hum when just the switch plugged in) but it was just a hum...the pump was not actually pumping either way. Not sure if that signifies the pump is ok but there is a clog or something?
     
  10. Jun 13, 2018 #10

    justin_dewan90

    justin_dewan90

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    I would say, don't let them replace it without having them see if it's clogged under the pump first. Humming means the motor is still trying to run. But if it's a twenty year old pump. Might be a good time to switch it out.
     
  11. Jun 13, 2018 #11

    Geofd

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    I just replace mine.....it was 15 years oldit was about 300-400 for the pump....I also changed the check valve......get a (quiet)one they don't bang as much I also installed a ball valve with a union....
     
  12. Jun 14, 2018 #12

    pasadena_commut

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    Does the pump motor have a start capacitor? It would be cylinder probably an inch or more in diameter and several inches long with wires on just one end. A lot of motors need one to start and when the capacitors go bad, which they all eventually do from age, the motor will just hum. If that is what it is and there is some way to "push start" the pump (like an axle sticking out that you could turn) then if it goes once started it is almost certainly the capacitor. (This is super common on the outside part of home A/C units. If one is sitting there humming, and pushing the fan blade with a stick [NEVER YOUR HAND!] gets it to start, and it keeps going, then the problem is the start capacitor.) The capacitors are inexpensive and you can easily replace one, as long as you are careful not to electrocute yourself.

    That said since the motors for sewer pumps are in a wet nasty environment if they have a start capacitor it may be permanently sealed inside a housing with the motor, making it impossible to replace. Searching, aha, does it look something like this???

    https://www.pumpproducts.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Breakdown2.jpg

    For the unit in the picture it looks like removing a few bolts will release the top part of the casing, allowing access to the capacitor for replacement.
     
  13. Jun 14, 2018 #13

    Matt30

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    If you don't use the basement plumbing much, it's more than likely the pump motor is seized than a type of clog. If the discharge piping was clogged, the pump would not hum. It would sound like it's running smooth and normal and just swirl water around inside the tank. Something could be jamming the motor up but you won't know until the pump is up and out. And it can be inspected.
     

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