tim's shower project

Discussion in 'Showers and Tubs' started by seatofpantstile, Jan 21, 2012.

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  1. Jan 21, 2012 #1

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

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    Been creeping this forum for a bit prior to my project.

    I have a question about the plumbing for my project.

    The Project.
    I'm attempting a tile shower. I ripped out my old shower and replaced the runs to line up with the new valve. The brass nipples that came with the valve won't thread in the copper adapter that I purchased. They also won't thread in backwards to the Escutcheon so I'm pretty sure it's not the threads in the copper adapter.

    Here's a pic of the connection I'm attempting.

    photo.JPG
     
  2. Jan 21, 2012 #2

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

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    So my question is do they sell the brass nipples at home depot like stores?
    Is there a better way to do this connection?

    Also whats the best way to support this valve in the wall.
    Just run the pipe over a 2x4 and secure with tube clamps?

    Thanks Tim.
     
  3. Jan 21, 2012 #3

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

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    Here's the insides of the wall as they are right now.

    There's a tub on the other side of the wall.

    theses are the spec's as advertized
    # Wall Mount Exposed Shower Faucet with Handshower
    # 1/2in IPS inlets
    # 3 3/8 in Centers
    # 17 1/2in Shower arm reach
    # 54in Overall height
    # includes handshower, cradle and optional wall bracket
    # Hot and Cold porcelain lever handles

    IMG_0786a.jpg
     
  4. Jan 21, 2012 #4

    johnjh2o

    johnjh2o

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    That is not a anti scald shower faucet it's not allowed by code. It looks like a legged tub faucet. If you ever try to sell your home with that faucet installed you will not pass the building inspection. This can become a problem as insurance company's in many instances will not insure homes with code violations. It is becoming a problem in many areas. In my area they won"t insure homes with aluminum wire,older roofs and for many other reasons.

    John
     
  5. Jan 21, 2012 #5

    seatofpantstile

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    Thanks for the advice but, I've got one on the tank now. After learning too late last week! thanks. Any advice on the topic at hand.
     
  6. Jan 21, 2012 #6

    Mr_David

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    can you post some additional views of the faucet.
    I presume this will mount on the finished wall.

    Do you have all the original hardware for the valve?
    Maybe similar to a kitchen wall mount faucet of which has 2 eccentric fittings that screw onto nipples and then rotate them a little .
    This is to compensate for small rough-in errors. the other side of eccentric fitting has a union that connects to the faucet.
    Does this valve have something similar?
     
  7. Jan 21, 2012 #7

    Mr_David

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    after looking at photo a little more I can see the offset tapped hole in bottom and the left fitting is disconnected from valve
    Try using a 1/2" brass nipple. Maybe those nipples you have are for something else.

    Good luck with that.
    Personnaly unless you have some really good fabricating skills, that looks like it's going to be a very challanging project.
    I would very much like to see it when it's done.
    I'm not on this forum as much as I used to be but I like funky projects.
    So maybe I'll pop in more often just see the progress and help out if I can.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  8. Jan 21, 2012 #8

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

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    That brass nipple was the original hardware I think the threads were just screwed up. I took your advice and got a 1/2" brass adapter to go right from the pipe to the Escutcheon.
    Am I right about just going over a 2x4 and securing it with the nail in clamps
     
  9. Jan 21, 2012 #9

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

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    Here's the diagram from the website to help.

    IMG_0756.jpg
     
  10. Jan 21, 2012 #10

    LiQuId

    LiQuId

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    check the maufacturers specs for a rough in guide.. what is the make of the faucet?
     
  11. Jan 22, 2012 #11

    seatofpantstile

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    The specs don't say shyte about it...... It's a Elizabethan Classic ECETS12
    Thx
     
  12. Jan 22, 2012 #12

    johnjh2o

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    That is a faucet for a legged tub. And having a mixing valve on you tank in no way allows you to use that faucet as a shower valve. In my opinion there is no way I would ever install that valve on a shower or even give advice as to how to do it.

    John
     
  13. Jan 22, 2012 #13

    LiQuId

    LiQuId

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    Agreed. the valve is not suited for the application .
     
  14. Jan 22, 2012 #14

    seatofpantstile

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    Here's the code in question
    "Some common options for compliance with the requirements of Article 7.6.5.1.
    include:
    • Installation of pressure-balanced or thermostatic-mixing shower valves for
    shower heads and an anti-scald device at each hot water faucet, or
    • Installation of an anti-scald mixing valve at the outlet of the water heater to
    lower the temperature to 490C, or
    • Installation of a water heater with an integral anti-scald device."

    So I get that you don't quite like this faucet John but I humbly think your wrong on it being for a tub. Here's the link to their site.
    Belle Foret Exposed Tub and Shower Faucet ECETS12CP Chrome

    So it might not be the best suited but it's what I got. Anyone else got some hot tips on how to put it up?

    Thx.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  15. Jan 22, 2012 #15

    johnjh2o

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    I was referring to US codes your quoting Canadian. Just my opinion but if tempering valves are allowed at the heater then way not just lower the temperature setting on the heater.

    John
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  16. Jan 23, 2012 #16

    Mr_David

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    You're going to want to use a fitting you can secure inside the wall. Tried to find a picture of a hyco fitting. But I did find some listed as Hy-Ear fittings. these are attached to a starp that will hold the fitting so you can install a nipple from the outside of the wall. Typically used to hold tub spout/shower arm fittings. Google images of Hy Ear brass fittings

    But this back ear fitting will probably be a better choice. Less likely to break the tabs off. In your application the hy ear tabs have a higher potential of failure and can break off

    imagesCAX7OUAV.jpg
     
  17. Jan 23, 2012 #17

    Mr_David

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    I originally thought you were going to replace the valve on the fiberglass tub. I just realized you are installing a complete new shower back to back with the exiting tub/shwr unit.

    the trouble you may have is the finished wall to stud. You need to be pretty accurate as to how thick the finished wall is going to be. Nipples come in 1/2" increments. Then set the back-ear fittings securely to wood, making sure they are straight and square. I would prefab the valve in place then remove it and install some long sacrificial nipples while installing finished wall.
     
  18. Jan 24, 2012 #18

    LiQuId

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    The reasoning is this.

    140 'F = 60' C ( sorry for conversion I tend to think in C for some things )
    maximum allowablle temperature at a point of use is 49 ' C ( 120 f )

    but the temperature in the hot water tank must be at least 140 to inhibit the formation of leigonella bacteria

    - 70 to 80 °C (158 to 176 °F): Disinfection range
    - At 66 °C (151 °F): Legionellae die within 2 minutes
    - At 60 °C (140 °F): They die within 32 minutes
    - At 55 °C (131 °F): They die within 5 to 6 hours
    - Above 50 °C (122 °F): They can survive but do not multiply
    -35 to 46 °C (95 to 115 °F): Ideal growth range
    -20 to 50 °C (68 to 122 °F): Growth range
    - Below 20 °C (68 °F): They can survive but are dormant


    ^ chopped that list off of wiki..

    So it is basically another safety issue.
     
  19. Jan 24, 2012 #19

    seatofpantstile

    seatofpantstile

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    So this is what I ended up doing prior to reading the last bit of advice.

    Is this good or should I redo it. I've closed in the wall but could remove the backer board as I haven't sealed it yet.

    Thx

    photo(4).JPG

    photo(5).JPG
     
  20. Jan 28, 2012 #20

    Mr_David

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    Sorry I didn't get back to you I'm a little under the weather. the tabs on the fitting I showed you hold it from turning. You risk twisting the pipe or even breaking a solder joint because you can't hold the fitting to assemble or disassemble


    you can use this 1/2" pipe hanger
     

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