SuperStor Corrosion Leaks

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kenwood850

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I have a SuperStor SS40 indirect hot water heater that I installed in 2001. It is beginning to leak for sure at all the fittings including the well where the aquastat sits. There are also signs of water at the base where the shell meets the base, but I suspect they are only the result of water from the fittings running down and following the seam at the bottom until it evaporates.

In theory the tank is non corroding stainless steel but the pipe fittings are copper, so my question is, is the leaking at the fittings only the result of the pipe fittings deteriorating and if I replace them will it cure the problem? Or am I only wishful thinking and the tank will need to be replaced as well?
 

CT18

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20 years is great. I just put one in for a friend and the old one was manufactured in 2013. The bottom had let go while they were away and came home to a nice flood in the basement.
 

kenwood850

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@Twowaxhack: I doubt if it is condensation. It is a hot water heater and the tank and all the fittings are always above ambient temperature. Even at 100% relative humidity, the dew point does not exceed the ambient temperature.

I have done a littel more reading and apparently there can be galvanic corrosion between copper and stainless steel If that is the case, and if that is what I is going on here, both metals are probably corroding even if the copper is getting the worst of it. It would appear that without any contradicting comments, I should probably plan on a new hot water heater. Perhaps this time I will use CPVC fitting between the copper and the tank.. It might not stop the galvanic process, but it might not localize it to the threaded area of the tank.
 

Twowaxhack

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@Twowaxhack: I doubt if it is condensation. It is a hot water heater and the tank and all the fittings are always above ambient temperature. Even at 100% relative humidity, the dew point does not exceed the ambient temperature.

I have done a littel more reading and apparently there can be galvanic corrosion between copper and stainless steel If that is the case, and if that is what I is going on here, both metals are probably corroding even if the copper is getting the worst of it. It would appear that without any contradicting comments, I should probably plan on a new hot water heater. Perhaps this time I will use CPVC fitting between the copper and the tank.. It might not stop the galvanic process, but it might not localize it to the threaded area of the tank.
Use some 316L stainless nipples at least 6” long to connect the new stainless tank.

I didn’t catch that it was indirect fired. Typical water heaters can condensate heavily as the hot water is drawn off and cold water is filling.
 

kenwood850

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@Twowaxhack:
Point taken on condensation at the cold water inlet, but in this case all the fittings, including the boiler feed and return, seem to be leaking. At the moment, the leaks are never enough to wet the floor before it evaporates where it collects at the seam, but I am sure it is only a matter of time. Good thought on the stainless steel nipples. Thanks for taking the time to reply
 
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