Sump pump lifespan.

Discussion in 'Pumps and Wells' started by tailgunner, Jan 23, 2020.

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  1. Jan 23, 2020 #1

    tailgunner

    tailgunner

    tailgunner

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    Just curious . I have a Zoeller m53 sump pump that has been working just fine . I installed it on 4-08-2015 , after the original pos that came with the house crapped out after two years. Just wondering on what I can expect on the lifespan for this pump. I do have a water powered back up pump. Thanks , Bob
     
  2. Jan 23, 2020 #2

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    They usually last about 7-10 years, but I have seen some die after 5, or last 15 years.

    Usually the float switch dies first.
    Sometimes they stick always on, sometimes always off.

    You can replace that, Zoeller sells a new switch that goes inside the sealed compartment on top.

    Sometimes the compartment is too corroded from years of slight leakage.

    I often buy that pump as a manual pump, then I can just easily change out a switch clamped to the discharge pipe.
     
  3. Jan 23, 2020 #3

    tailgunner

    tailgunner

    tailgunner

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    Thanks for the info , Jeff.
     
  4. Jan 23, 2020 #4

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    If you don’t have a backup pump installed, I recommend you have a new (or old but still good) pump set up and ready to be swapped out.

    With a discharge pipe already attached, and cut so it is the exact size to just take the old pump off from under the check valve, and pop in the new one.

    Should take only a few minutes during a crisis.

    And have a new check valve right nearby.

    If you have two pumps in the pit, you absolutely need to have spare check valves on hand.

    Otherwise, if a check valve poops out, the pumped water from the other pump will mostly run right up, over, and back down into the pit.
     

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