Sump pit

Help Support Plumbing Forums:

Luis001

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Boston
Hi all,

I just moved to a house and getting familiar with sump pumps which I didn't really know. I'm attaching a picture of the sump pit. My question is why this never dries? Where does the water usually come from? I understand sump pumps are there to take the water out but is there anything that can be done to prevent water coming in the first place? I noticed that when it rains the level raises. Whenever I remove the water from the pit it quickly fills up again but to the level the picture shows doesn't go above, is that normal? What can be wrong with this house? I took the sump pump from the deeper pit because it was running every 10 seconds unnecessarily because is not really flooding, water just get to the level in the picture and the pump still activates from that location im guessing.

I appreciate your help. Trying to educate myself.
 

Attachments

Geofd

Moderator
Staff member
Professional
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Messages
2,972
Reaction score
622
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
My 1st house had a underground spring run under it the water was always at a certain level,nothing wrong with your house ,was thi disclosed to you during the purchase, did the inspector(house) see it, what did his notes say we knew about the water in our house, we just dealt with it
 

Luis001

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Boston
My 1st house had a underground spring run under it the water was always at a certain level,nothing wrong with your house ,was thi disclosed to you during the purchase, did the inspector(house) see it, what did his notes say we knew about the water in our house, we just dealt with it
Geof. It wasn't disclosed if that were the case. Also, just to add this house is 2 blocks from a harbor/ocean. Giving the competitive market the inspection was waved and now this issue worries me. Just trying to get some opinions before I call an inspector. Should this be a plumber? Or what type of skills should I look for for this issue.
Thanks!
 

Geofd

Moderator
Staff member
Professional
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Messages
2,972
Reaction score
622
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
You might try a plumber but there are basement finishing co.s out there, that can help my neighbor were I had the issue had a co come in and jack hammer the out side edge of the basement floor and put french drains and a pump or 2 in, there probably no stopping the water you just have to figure out the best way
To collect and pump the water away from the house, I never asked do you have gutters, are the down spouts directed away from the house ,that will also help
 

RS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2019
Messages
271
Reaction score
90
Location
USA
Whatever you do you need to prevent the pump from starting every 10 seconds, it won't last long that way. A bigger sump pit, or a different style of switch, also if there isn't a check valve in the discharge line it's just pumping the same water over and over. I wouldn't be very comfortable with the water level so high. It looks like it's just a few inches below the floor level, that will make for a very damp basement.
 

RS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2019
Messages
271
Reaction score
90
Location
USA
Looking at your photos more closely I don't see a check valve, I think you need one, but it depends how the discharge is set up. I have made up a vacuum breaker just outside the wall so the water can run both ways, and leave the line empty, so there isn't anything to freeze. Being so close to the ocean, is the water salty? And where does it discharge to? I think it freezes in the Boston area, so the discharge has to be kept open.
 

CT18

professional
Professional
Joined
Apr 30, 2014
Messages
951
Reaction score
351
Location
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
I would get a local plumbing company over there and ask them about your set up and what they recommend. It didn't look like the correct pit, looked like a hole in the ground. Like someone said above you should have a check valve. That whole set up looks shady to me at least. I have a sump that is in a pit and piped with 1 1/2" pvc to outside with a check valve
 

Luis001

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Boston
You might try a plumber but there are basement finishing co.s out there, that can help my neighbor were I had the issue had a co come in and jack hammer the out side edge of the basement floor and put french drains and a pump or 2 in, there probably no stopping the water you just have to figure out the best way
To collect and pump the water away from the house, I never asked do you have gutters, are the down spouts directed away from the house ,that will also help
Thanks again. Yes there are downspouts directing water away however there is one that goes straight down/ buried, I just wonder to what it connects.
 

Luis001

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Boston
Looking at your photos more closely I don't see a check valve, I think you need one, but it depends how the discharge is set up. I have made up a vacuum breaker just outside the wall so the water can run both ways, and leave the line empty, so there isn't anything to freeze. Being so close to the ocean, is the water salty? And where does it discharge to? I think it freezes in the Boston area, so the discharge has to be kept open.
Water doesn't seem to be salty, it discharges to the swer which I found out is not allowed.
 

RS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2019
Messages
271
Reaction score
90
Location
USA
Possibly the downspout that goes straight down goes into the drainage system and ends up in the sump pit? Although, most sump pumps run more when it's raining. And yes, it's not usually allowed to pump sump water into a sanitary sewer, hopefully you can just pump it away from the house somewhere.
 

Luis001

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Boston
Thanks all that have opined so far. Another person suggested I might need to install french drain system in the basement, that it might have to do with water table...I guess I wont know for sure until I get an expert in just don't want to get oversold on something I don't need. If that were the case, any idea how much a reasonable price would be?
 

Geofd

Moderator
Staff member
Professional
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Messages
2,972
Reaction score
622
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Thanks again. Yes there are downspouts directing water away however there is one that goes straight down/ buried, I just wonder to what it connects.
Put some dye, or food coloring in the gutter to the down spout flush it into the down spout, and see if that pit changes color
 
Top