Sulfur smell coming from the shower drain

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Twowaxhack

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Have someone pour peppermint oil and water down each roof stack.

You stay inside and see if you smell peppermint.

It’s better than a smoke test for a small hidden leak.

Turn all ventilation equipment off.

It might take a little while to smell it, so don’t give up immediately.

This will also prove your toilet is sealed, as you’ve just replaced the wax.

I also believe it could very well be the anode rod like others have mentioned.
 

JG plumbing

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What is your water heater turned up to? Try turning it up to 140 see if it helps. Be careful.
 

HandyGuy

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Change the anode rod in the water heater.
Then drain and flush the heater, then sanitize the plumbing system with bleach.
You can find videos on how to do it, on Youtube.
Or someone on here might feel like giving a lesson.
Jeff, you're a genius. You're spot on. IT WAS THE ROD. I replaced the one with anode and the problem went away- this was last May. I apologize for the late reply. It was funny, I asked the famous company that installed the water heater and he wanted to do the diagnosis. I told him what needs to be replaced and he was insulted that i knew what needs to be done to solve the problem. When I told him that I got the info from this forum, he was pretty upset and didn't want to do the job without "diagnosis" so i got it done by a handyman for $75.
 

Jeff Handy

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Jeff, you're a genius. You're spot on. IT WAS THE ROD. I replaced the one with anode and the problem went away- this was last May. I apologize for the late reply. It was funny, I asked the famous company that installed the water heater and he wanted to do the diagnosis. I told him what needs to be replaced and he was insulted that i knew what needs to be done to solve the problem. When I told him that I got the info from this forum, he was pretty upset and didn't want to do the job without "diagnosis" so i got it done by a handyman for $75.
Hurray! 😬
 

cliffyk

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I had not previously read of a relatively new magnesium anode smelling so badly. Is this common? Ours lasted 3 years before it had to be replaced (w/ Al/Zn)--shallow well w/Pentair PT 4 iron/manganse filter, NE Florida...
 
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Jeff Handy

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It is because the magnesium rod reacts with bacteria and/or minerals in the water.
It creates sulfur smell and sometimes sulfur taste.
The rod can be changed out for a rod of a different alloy, which does not cause that stinky reaction.
 

cliffyk

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It is because the magnesium rod reacts with bacteria and/or minerals in the water.
It creates sulfur smell and sometimes sulfur taste.
The rod can be changed out for a rod of a different alloy, which does not cause that stinky reaction.
That part I knew, but i had not heard of it happening so soon into a heater's life. I replaced ours with an aluminum/zinc rod realier this year (the OEM magnesium rod lasted almost 3 years before it began to stink)...
 

Jeff Handy

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That part I knew, but i had not heard of it happening so soon into a heater's life. I replaced ours with an aluminum/zinc rod realier this year (the OEM magnesium rod lasted almost 3 years before it began to stink)...
You are just getting it all wrong.
You are convincing yourself that two unrelated conditions are part of the same chemical or electrical reaction.
The stink reaction starts right away.
It might take a few days to build up.
The issue of a rod shrinking and wearing out over time is totally unrelated to the issue of the sulfur stink reaction.
 

cliffyk

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You are just getting it all wrong.
You are convincing yourself that two unrelated conditions are part of the same chemical or electrical reaction.
The stink reaction starts right away.
It might take a few days to build up.
The issue of a rod shrinking and wearing out over time is totally unrelated to the issue of the sulfur stink reaction.
Ours did not stink for 2-3/4 years, then it was like somone threw a switch--the stink disappeared within 45 minutes of changing to the Al/Zn rod...
 

Jeff Handy

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Then your water chemistry or treatment had changed, which then reacted with the magnesium rod.
If the magnesium rod had worn out, it would actually have caused less stink, not more.
 

cliffyk

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Then your water chemistry or treatment had changed, which then reacted with the magnesium rod.
If the magnesium rod had worn out, it would actually have caused less stink, not more.
It (the water) may have changed but same 12-yo well, same treatment. The old anode was corroded, but 30-40% intact.
 
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