Rough-in Plumbing Layout

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Welch_79

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Hey everybody, I am new to this forum. I had a question if anybody has any input, it would be awesome. We are doing rough-in plumbing for a bathroom in our garage. There will be a sewage ejector on the outside of the building that we will stub out to. We are decently green to this, and had a couple of questions. As far as the layout goes, I know we are wanting to avoid any 90° turns When tying in the smaller drains to the toilet main drain before heading out to the sewage ejector. The problem Is the run of the main drain is pretty short . I can angle it over to gain some length ( see dotted line) but am still not sure what a good configuration would be . Here’s a rough drawing of where the drains would be. As far as where we stub out, the closer to the toilet the better, as that is where the sewage ejector is on the septic plan. Ideasimage.jpg are welcome!
 

breplum

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You should do a layout after learning more about plumbing or if you get lucky here, perhaps someone will take the time to draw for you.
Don't do what you drew in the pic.
 

Welch_79

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You should do a layout after learning more about plumbing or if you get lucky here, perhaps someone will take the time to draw for you.
Don't do what you drew in the pic.
Thank you for your reply! The pic was just for a rough reference on where the drains are. Not a plan by any means. I’ve done a few drawings, but can’t quite figure out how to tie in with such a short distant from main line to ejector outside. I watched tons of videos with ejectors inside the building, but can’t seem to find any like this scenario.I’m not expecting anyone to draw me a diagram, though that surely would be nice to get lucky! Lol. I am we’re just wondering if this is an issue someone else may have had that might have a suggestion.:)
 

breplum

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I've done many small bathrooms like your drawing, and actually ran a trunk line outside to pick up the drains. Vents can be inside or out depending on how you lay out.
I'll show you in a drawing.
But for the ejector, you haven't shown what your limitations are so please indicate that first.
If you can not cram yourself in, then it is so much easier to do.

My adult son lives in Spokane Valley, so I have a soft spot Spokane connection. Nice area. Hot and smoky today.
 

Zanne

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Yeah, you definitely will need to have plumbing vents. You showed the wall with the toilet and shower is 6', what is the length of the adjacent wall? It looks like you wrote something on the edge of the paper but it's not visible. Looks like it might be 7 or 9? Or maybe it's just a line. LOL.

Door placement and size will help figure out where stuff can run. Any windows?
 

Welch_79

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I've done many small bathrooms like your drawing, and actually ran a trunk line outside to pick up the drains. Vents can be inside or out depending on how you lay out.
I'll show you in a drawing.
But for the ejector, you haven't shown what your limitations are so please indicate that first.
If you can not cram yourself in, then it is so much easier to do.

My adult son lives in Spokane Valley, so I have a soft spot Spokane connection. Nice area. Hot and smoky today.
I appreciate your reply. Thank you! So the limitation is that the septic plans for the outside pump, which have already been drawn up and approved, show the sewage ejector to be located about where the toilet is(but on the outside of the building) but it seems unlikely to be able to stub out around there and still be able to tie everything in at good angles. I don’t think it’s that big of deal to revise the plans to move the pump closer to the corner of the house , and stub out further toward the shower which would maybe up the options for a decent configuration.

I know the plumber who looked at things back in January said he would stub out one line, so somehow he must’ve thought he could do it without running lines outside, but I didn’t pay attention at the time! I’m all ears for ideas.

The pit that we dug for the pump has the pump sitting right at the minimum distance from the foundation wall which is 5ft. Would we needed to move that out farther if running lines outside? I would think it would be okay. Anyway, thanks again and thanks for getting patient with a newbie.

Neat Spokane connection. Yes, hot and super smoky today! Hoping for some fresher air soon.
 

Welch_79

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Yeah, you definitely will need to have plumbing vents. You showed the wall with the toilet and shower is 6', what is the length of the adjacent wall? It looks like you wrote something on the edge of the paper but it's not visible. Looks like it might be 7 or 9? Or maybe it's just a line. LOL.

Door placement and size will help figure out where stuff can run. Any windows?
Hey there. Thanks for the reply! Yes, that adjacent wall is 7 feet. There is a window pretty much right above the toilet. The door is right next to the vanity on on the wall opposite of toilet. Hope that helps.:)
 

SHEPLMBR

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May I ask why the pit is outside? What will keep it from freezing?
 

Welch_79

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May I ask why the pit is outside? What will keep it from freezing?
I was trusting the designer on that one. He said that that wouldnt be an issue. The pump itself sits about 7 feet underground, so real decently under the frost line. I asked the supply guys if they recommend insulation or anything, and he said there’s not usually a problem , but if I was worried about it to just put some foam board underneath the lid and that would be more than sufficient to keep things from freezing. I’ll definitely keep keen on things though. Space was super limited inside, he said It wouldn’t make a big difference either way if it was inside or outside, so we went with outside. 😬
 

breplum

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All the piping like shutoff and backflow have to be permanently accessible.
A foam board cover does nothing much.
Outside makes no sense whatsoever.
 

Zanne

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I spent a couple weeks in Spokane when we transferred back to the mainland US. My father spent about a year working there. I remember it being very cold because we arrived in October. But I had just come from a tropical island. Heard it got a lot colder deeper in to winter. So freezing pipes is absolutely an issue. Any external pipes would need to be wrapped in insulation, but it would be best to avoid any outdoor pipes above the frost level.
 

Twowaxhack

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Here in the south there are very few ejectors inside a building. Very few basements.

The frostline is about 3” 🤣

There are whole neighborhoods on forced sewer main grinder pumps. The Minimum for me to even come look at one is $250.00. If I have to pull the pump out of the pit it’s a $400 minimum.

If they don’t like it, GOOD 🤡🤣
 

Welch_79

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There are no pipes exposed, the check valve is accessible through the lid onthe basin which is flush with finished grade. All pipes are located underground. If I remember right the frost line for sewage pipes here is 2’. This was all in consideration when the plans were drawn up. If anyone’s curious this is what the pump underground looks like with noted elevations. image.jpg
 

Twowaxhack

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There are no pipes exposed, the check valve is accessible through the lid onthe basin which is flush with finished grade. All pipes are located underground. If I remember right the frost line for sewage pipes here is 2’. This was all in consideration when the plans were drawn up. If anyone’s curious this is what the pump underground looks like with noted elevations. View attachment 30954
I install the same type systems. They work great. 🤓
 

Welch_79

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Yep! That’s it.:)
This thread has kind of taken the sideways turn. 😁 i’m still curious about my plumbing layout. Lol! ... But these are good things to think about too!
 

Twowaxhack

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Yep! That’s it.:)
This thread has kind of taken the sideways turn. 😁 i’m still curious about my plumbing layout. Lol! ... But these are good things to think about too!
Pipe it just like any other bathroom. Stub out one time, if you’re going to install it outside.
 
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