Removing a bathroom sink

Discussion in 'Toilets and Sinks' started by Erik L, Apr 29, 2018.

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  1. Apr 29, 2018 #1

    Erik L

    Erik L

    Erik L

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    Hi -

    This is my first post here and it may be a dumb one, but I wanted to be sure as I've never done this before.

    I'm having a custom vanity built and it will be ready to install soon. Before it can be installed, I need to remove the old sink and vanity to make space for it. The question I have is about the old sink removal.

    I watched some youtube videos and the sink removal seems pretty straightforward. My big question is, once I turn off the water valves under the sink and disconnect the lines from the faucet, is it safe to turn the main water back on? Should I be concerned at all about any water leakage or anything coming from the undersink water lines when they're not attached to a faucet?

    Thanks for any feedback on this and if you have any other advice for me regarding bathroom sink removal, please send it along as I would love to know.

    Thanks!
    erik
     
  2. Apr 30, 2018 #2

    havasu

    havasu

    havasu

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    It depends on how old and how long the valves have been used. Before disconnectng anything, shut off the hot and cold valves, then turn on the water and see if you have drips or constant dribble of water. This will help you to determine if the valves are holding tight.
     
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  3. Apr 30, 2018 #3

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

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    It depends on the ability of the shutoff valves to actually close fully. If you have 1/4 turn ball valves, it is highly likely that they will completely shut off the water. If you have multi-turn valves, the rubber washer may be old, dried out and/or cracked such that the water still drips out when the valve is turned off. A picture would be helpful, but if your valves have male threads where the flex line would connect to it, you can get a cap to thread on to the valve if it doesn't shutoff the water completely.

    Hope that helps.
     
  4. Apr 30, 2018 #4

    Erik L

    Erik L

    Erik L

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    Got it. Makes sense. Thank you!
     
  5. Apr 30, 2018 #5

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

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    I don't know how long between removal and re-installation. If your valves don't shut off completely, you could attach flex lines to the valves, and put the other end of the flex lines in a 5 gallon bucket. That will collect any drips during the switchover. Also, have you checked to see if there are isolation valves in your basement. Often, valves are put on the risers that feed each floor. Shutting off both the isolation valve in the basement and the shutoff under the sink, might stop any leaking from happening.
     

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