Reduce expand reduce again

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andrewmgsa

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Thanks in advance for help!
My home has bad water pressure. When one thing is on (like the kitchen sink) , pressure is fine. If another sink is on, then both sink faucets pressure drops significantly. ... I noticed that the water main line coming in the house is 3/4 inch and it has a reducer to 1/2 inch Before it hits the water meter. Then it goes back to 3/4 for the water meter. Output of meter is 3/4, then a reducer back to 1/2. (Meter inputs and outputs are both 3/4)... Could this be a cause of my pressure problem? Is it odd that it reduces to 1/2 and expands back to 3/4 BEFORE it goes to the meter?
 

havasu

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Do you have galvanized or copper (or PEX) piping? Many homeowners opt for the 1/2" meter for residential properties because it is the cheapest for stand by fees. Problem is, most residential properties need a 3/4" meter to operate correctly.
 

Jamesplumbing06

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Or you simply have 1/2” pipe suppling your house. There’s your problem. Repipe. 3/4” trunks with 1/2 going to each individual faucet. 3/4 is your target. Meter size could be 8”. But if you only feed with 1/2”. Then you only get 1/2”.
 

andrewmgsa

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Do you have galvanized or copper (or PEX) piping? Many homeowners opt for the 1/2" meter for residential properties because it is the cheapest for stand by fees. Problem is, most residential properties need a 3/4" meter to operate correctly.
Water main is 3/4 galvanized. Rest is copper.
 

frodo

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the old galvanized line is most likely plugged up with calcium deposits
time for a new service line from the meter to the house

to verify

disconnect where the galvanized and copper connect and put a gauge on the old calvi
you will most likely not need to after you SEE what is inside the pipe.
 

Nukedaddy

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This almost certainly describes a 3/4” meter connected with standard 1/2” meter nipples. Meter nipples have loose nuts one size bigger than the nipple, so 3/4 FIP. This was the most common way to install meters prior to about 1960.
Yes, it is counterintuitive to reduce, then increase, the reduce and increase. But if the supply is in good shape, the reductions will go unnoticed.
I agree that the main supply is likely limed up.
 

frodo

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This almost certainly describes a 3/4” meter connected with standard 1/2” meter nipples. Meter nipples have loose nuts one size bigger than the nipple, so 3/4 FIP. This was the most common way to install meters prior to about 1960.
Yes, it is counterintuitive to reduce, then increase, the reduce and increase. But if the supply is in good shape, the reductions will go unnoticed.
I agree that the main supply is likely limed up.
with out a picture i have no idea what the meter is
 

andrewmgsa

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The zoomed in pic is rotated (sorry). What is that pipe coming out of the floor? Is it 3/4? Because the pipe into the meter is 3/4 and looks larger??? But the floor pipe is larger than 1/2. Is it galvanized?
 

Jeff Handy

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It looks like your incoming water line from the concrete is ready to burst from corrosion.
 

Nukedaddy

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Yep, as I guessed, the meter is connected with meter nipples. But I still agree, the service looks bad on outside and is almost surely limed up or filled with rust from tuberculation corrosion. Either will choke the pipe to a fraction of its carry capacity. You can prove the condition by adding a gauge near the meter. It will read the normal pressure with no faucet open but drop to near zero when any faucet is opened.
There is no “ fix” for such a water service, replacement is the only option. In many cases the corporation stop on the water main must be replaced as well. If the home is more than 50 years old, the water service from the main to the curb stop may even be lead pipe and then galvanized from the curb stop to the basement.
 

andrewmgsa

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Yep, as I guessed, the meter is connected with meter nipples. But I still agree, the service looks bad on outside and is almost surely limed up or filled with rust from tuberculation corrosion. Either will choke the pipe to a fraction of its carry capacity. You can prove the condition by adding a gauge near the meter. It will read the normal pressure with no faucet open but drop to near zero when any faucet is opened.
There is no “ fix” for such a water service, replacement is the only option. In many cases the corporation stop on the water main must be replaced as well. If the home is more than 50 years old, the water service from the main to the curb stop may even be lead pipe and then galvanized from the curb stop to the basement.
House is definitely more than 60 years old. Also the road is at the same level as the basement floor. We have a retaining wall for the yard which is 2 feet above the road surface. I know that the line is 3 feet below the road. Is there a chance that the line slopes up to our house (since Front yard ground is 2 feet higher than road)? I hope so because if not, the line would be 3 feet below our basement floor. Sounding very costly to get it replaced. Luckily our basement is not finished. All concrete.
 

Nukedaddy

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How far North is the home? In the upper Midwest deep burial is common. But, there are contractor who can replace such services by “Pipe Bursting” and pulling a new copper or PEX line to a pot-hole on the curb stop or even on the main’s corporation stop. With no Hugh ditches.
 

andrewmgsa

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How far North is the home? In the upper Midwest deep burial is common. But, there are contractor who can replace such services by “Pipe Bursting” and pulling a new copper or PEX line to a pot-hole on the curb stop or even on the main’s corporation stop. With no Hugh ditches.
New Jersey
 

Nukedaddy

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Is the house close to the street? Do you know where the curb stop is? The curb stop should be at the curb of the street or at the edge of the sidewalk. It should be at the bottom of a “Buffalo Box” with a top that is round and 4 to 6 inches diameter. You can measure the depth of your service in the Buffalo Box . Check with your water department. I heard that in some northeastern cities the service is owned by the department and it may be their responsibility to replace it.
 
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