PVC Epoxies?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Tools and Equipment' started by Montybell, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Jan 5, 2010 #1

    Montybell

    Montybell

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    When I attach a new cap and collar for an 8 inch clean out at street level do I need to use epoxy or should I allow it to just sit on top? It's pretty snug, and I don't think it's going any where.
     
  2. Jan 5, 2010 #2

    Mr.Whyso

    Mr.Whyso

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    If it fits it fits. If your not going to need access to it in the future I would go a head and cement it in place.
     
  3. Jan 5, 2010 #3

    Chris

    Chris

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    If you are talking about the cleanout adapter that slip in/over the pipe and then the cap threads into that then no there is no need. Sewer works on a gravity system so there should never be pressure that could push it off. you will be fine. I would not clue the cap on tho as it is a cleanout and may be used in the future although very rarely unless somehting backs up.
     
  4. Apr 17, 2010 #4

    CHRISM

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    I am based in the U.K. - England - unless our Drains are different in design to yours ? - AND you have MUCH LOWER Hygeine requirements ? - THEN any Drain Connection OR Termination - at low level - should be `AIR TIGHT`.
    If not then Methane Gas leaking out is a possibility - AND ANY possibility of [Air] leakage can contain `Hazards to Health` - Imagine the `Germs` that could be released !! - A `non airtight` connection / termination could be CONSTANTLY releasing `GERMS`.
    When a Drainage Vent Stack is installed - there WILL BE CODES / REGULATIONS - that prescribe where that VENT STACK can be TERMINATED.
    Those Codes will state a prescribed distance from ANY OPENING into the Building - AND a Minimum Height above OPENINGS AND ROOF LEVEL.
    That is because the `Gasses` and `Germs` will then be dispersed AWAY from any DOORS - WINDOWS - AIR VENTS ETC. - into the Atmosphere - HIGHER up than where people are in the adjacent area.
    I am not aware of the position that you were intending to place the Drain Cap and Collar - BUT I would guess that it would be near your Building - I `Strongly` advise against NOT SEALING it - it should be an `AIR TIGHT` seal.
    IF there is something about U.S. Drainage that would mean that I am giving `Incorrect` advice about this - PLEASE - let me know in a `POST`
    I am NOT trying to be `Critical` about U.S. Workmanship - Am I correct in the advice that I have given here?? CHRISM.
     
  5. Apr 18, 2010 #5

    majakdragon

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    A Clean-out is to allow access to the pipe. You would not seal it to the pipe.
     
  6. Apr 20, 2010 #6

    CHRISM

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    I realise that My Post `ended up VERY long - but My Main point was - UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES do you leave ANY fitting / termination on a Drain Run that is NOT AIR TIGHT.
    With an `Access Cap` - [various types exist] - the collar is SEALED to the pipe - then the CAP either screws into / onto that to make an AIR TIGHT SEAL, - other types use a rubber / neoprene gasket and have Bolts or machine screws to bolt down / screw down a PLATE to make an AIR TIGHT SEAL.
    There is `NO WAY` that the U.S. CODES would allow what you describe - ANY non-air tight connection or termination would allow `GERMS` and METHANE GAS to escape from the `NON SEALED` joint/termination.
    To state that a `clean out` has no need to be sealed is COMPLETELY INCORRECT !
    Is it not `OBVIOUS` - when thinking about the release of `GERMS` and METHANE GAS ???
    I would like to hear from a `Drainage Inspector` - who ENFORCES AND ADVISES ON CODES on
    Building Sites and refurbishments / renovations of Buildings.
    Although I am based in the U.K. - England - I KNOW that U.S. Codes on this subject COULD NOT ALLOW the situation that you describe - i.e. `UNSEALED`termination / joint.
    This is a REALLY FUNDAMENTAL area of `Basic Drainage` - to me.
    So as NOT to `aggravate` my U.S. `Colleagues` - I would appreciate an INSPECTOR or MASTER PLUMBER`s comments on this - which - `hopefully` - FOR U.S. Hygeine purposes - will show that my information is CORRECT on THIS.

    Your Comment on ` if you have never made a mistake you haven`t done much` - I hope is not `Directed` at ME.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010
  7. Apr 21, 2010 #7

    majakdragon

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    Sorry for the confusion CHRISM. What I meant was that if the cap was a true "clean-out", it could not be glued to the pipe. I agree that a threaded cap or plug should be installed at the termination point. This would allow access for cleaning out the pipe. My signature applies to those who think a mistake is a major happening that disqualifies you from doing anything else...ever. It also applies to those who claim they have never made a mistake. I have not met that "perfect" individual yet.
     
  8. Apr 22, 2010 #8

    CHRISM

    CHRISM

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    "Hi Majakdragon, I misunderstood you - I thought that your answer to my `detailed` description regarding terminations / joints on Drainage having to be `Airtight` - which was `brief`- was stating that I was `Wrong` and that what I now know to be your `Signature` phrase was a `flippant put-down`. [of me] - I later noticed that the `phrase` was a `signature` of yours - when I saw it on other `Posts`.

    I would agree with the premise of your phrase - BUT - when I put `Posts` onto this Forum - because I will NOT state as `FACT` anything that might be `different` in the U.S. from what is true / factual in the U.K. [where I am] - What I do write as Information or advice - WILL BE CORRECT.
    I am `Posting` on here information from a VERY extensive knowledge of the Plumbing, Heating [wet] and Gas Industries, I am a `Building Services Engineer` - with a `Master of Science` Degree in Building Services Engineering - I started my `Career` as an Apprentice Plumber - after 5 Years I `graduated` with `Distinction`- one of only 8 in the U.K. in that YEAR - from there I attended a Technical College [part-time] where I achieved a `Higher National Certificate` in Building Services which involved Heating, Ventilating and associated Electrical Works.
    I went on to engage in `Continued Professional Development`- where I took `professional courses` in `Building Services for Civil Engineering` [this enhanced my knowledge of Drainage] and further courses [and exams] in `Hot Water - High Pressure Storage and Supply` -` Electrical Services for Mechanical Engineering` and the VERY TECHNICAL `Gas Utilisation`- which covered ALL aspects of Gas Use, Safety, Installation, Testing, Inspecting and Certifying and Reporting of Dangerous Installations & Situations.
    I have to take Technical Exams on Gas Safety every 5 Years - to remain a `Gas Engineer`- these are Theory AND Practical in EVERY aspect of `Gas Utilisation`- and can take approximately a WEEK to complete - AND are expensive.
    Also to remain a `Registered Gas Engineer` - I have to re-register every Year and pay for a `Licence`/ I.D.Card and Certificate of registration.

    I also took `Approved Code of Practice` Courses/Exams on a lot of `Associated Trades` to the Building Services Industries - too many to `list` here - but for example - Ventilation.
    Throughout my Career I have also studied and passed MANY `Health and Safety` Exams - and I am qualified to undertake `Risk Assessment` on any Building Site / Work Site - for Health & Safety `Dangers`/ Risks.
    When I was `Site Based` - I had current First Aid Qualifications - in case of an Accident to my employees [or anyone] ,

    I have also been engaged as an `Expert Witness` in many Court Cases regarding Contractual Disputes - appearing BOTH for and against Heating and Plumbing Companies - where I `Specialised` in investigating the Design and Installation of Building Services - to determine `Fault` or `Negligence`.
    I have also been engaged as a `Mediator` - to settle disputes regarding similar matters - where my Qualifications and Knowledge were `respected` enough to be `accepted` by all parties to `Judge` on the matters - and my `findings` accepted to resolve the `Disputes.

    For the last 30 Years of my career I have been running my own Business - Contracting in Heating, Plumbing and Gas - Design and Installation.
    My previous Qualifications led me to decide to attend University to study `Building Services Engineering` - where I achieved my `Master of Science` Degree in that `subject` and the title of `Building Services Engineer`.

    I have NOT written this to `Brag` - although I am `proud` of my achievements - I wanted you and others to see from `where` my advice/ information comes - what I write IS NOT the `opinion` of someone with `a little knowledge`.
    I must add - although I am often involved in some `Highly Technical` Designs and Systems - I am still a PLUMBER at heart !!
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2010

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