Plumbing Code By State

Discussion in 'Plumbing Building Code' started by Zanne, Apr 2, 2014.

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  1. Aug 22, 2015 #21

    Zanne

    Zanne

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    My pleasure. I hope it can help people who don't know what code is used in their area so people can refer to this as reference.

    I'll try to keep it updated.
     
  2. Aug 6, 2016 #22

    Zanne

    Zanne

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    Effective January 1, 2016: Louisiana no longer has its own plumbing code. Instead, it now must adhere to the rules of the 2012 version of IPC.

    http://new.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/page/1523
    I wonder if that means that AAVs can now be used again, or if they are still forbidden.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2016
  3. Jan 18, 2017 #23

    skelly716

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    California (Title 24) used to be called UPC (Uniform Plumbing Code) and now it's the CPC (California Plumbing Code).
     
  4. Mar 22, 2017 #24

    Zanne

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  5. Mar 22, 2017 #25

    SHEPLMBR

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    With the exception of Loudoun County in VA. They make the rules up as they go or if they need the revenue. lol. That and in WVA the weirdest thing is they do not require a Rough In inspection. They do it all at final. Go figure.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
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  6. Sep 11, 2018 #26

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Just noticed this list of Plumbing Code by State.
    The code for Massachusetts is not the UPC.
    Your source for the list shows it correctly as, "Uniform State Plumbing Code, 248 CMR 10.00".
    Not "UPC, 248 CMR 10.00" as shown above.
    Mass. has always had their own plumbing code.
     
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  7. Sep 12, 2018 #27

    Mikey

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    Does the 2x distance have to be in a straight line?

    In WA we use UPC 2015 I think, with various "errata" sheets and other addenda, plus whatever the AHJ feels like that day.
     
  8. Sep 13, 2018 #28

    Diehard

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    If I am understanding you correctly, it has to be in a straight line to accomplish its objective. Which is to maintain a space above the flow for air and avoid siphoning potential.
    Max allowable Trap Arm Length.jpg
    It's 6ft for a 2" pipe in Mass.
    Distance of fixture trap to vent in  Mass.jpg
     
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  9. Sep 13, 2018 #29

    Mikey

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    If you imagine a bend in that straight line, but continuing downward at the same slope, you have the same siphoning characteristics.
     
  10. Sep 14, 2018 #30

    Diehard

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    Sorry you lost me on "a bend in a straight line..."o_O
     
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  11. Sep 14, 2018 #31

    Mikey

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    Like a drain going around a corner in the framing, but continuing downward at the same slope. If the developed length of that run and the drop are the same as those in a straight line, I don't see why the siphoning characteristics should be any different.
     
  12. Sep 14, 2018 #32

    FishScreener

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    Correct, Mikey.
     
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  13. Sep 14, 2018 #33

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Oh ...I gotcha. Didn't think about it that way. Yeah it wouldn't matter, the same would apply if it was curve or straight. It's the total distance and resulting fall that matters. 8 foot distance at 1/4"/ft would be 8 x 1/4" or 2", the total diameter of the pipe, which effectively closes off the venting capabilities. It's 6 ft, in many cases, to make it conservative.
     
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