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anticlmatic

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I absolutely hate those sink drain baskets with the big nut and nothing to easily grip to torque it down. Sometimes I wonder who designs this stuff and why.
 

frodo

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I need a couple things that are not on the market yet.

1. Pre-trained/experienced shovels
2. I need both a right and left handed pipe stretcher, the universal ones are no good. I can't find them anywhere on the market.
3. Gas power wheel barrow would be nice.

That's all I can think of for now.

I finally found a metric crescent wrench, I had to drive around to 3 pawn shops to find it

The pre-trained /experienced shovels I can help you out with
the experienced Paulas do not hang out at the home depot
they are a little more upscale and can be found a Lowes or Ace

I carry a medium size can of whoopass on my truck for the really aggravating jobs and it can be found charged under Misc. materials on the invoice
quantity 1 medium can whoopass @ $37.50
 

Jamesplumbing06

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Has anyone ever found one those special HOT water heaters? I need my hot water to be hot. Again.
I sent my new guy to truck for that pipe stretcher. He brought me my expansion pex tool. guess that technology has caught up with the “get away from me for a minute” tool.
 

frodo

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here is a fitting you can send him after
a 2 x 2 x 2 san tee with a 3'' side outlet

i had a smart ass bring me back a box of tees and bushings, told me to wing it
i kept that dude. lol
 

Jamesplumbing06

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Yeah at least they listening to the words. I gonna have to try that fitting with a few experienced guys.
 

Jamesplumbing06

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Not sure there is a max. I seen a few sewers going down a hill at 45 - 30 degrees, Or even vertical.

I have never understood maximum drop. Somebody please tell me how to get from top floor to bottom floor with drain. And not exceed the maximum? Whatever a maximum is. So many have tried to explain how water can outrun solids. But I run a plumb straight vertical pipe. Is that maximum? And newton says gravity acts equally on every object. The maximum really only apply to a vented arm over. That I know of. But if everything behind your slope is vented then let it fall.
 

Mikey

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Newton and Galileo were right, and a recent experiment shows it dramatically; I loved watching those high-powered scientists gawking over it:
 

Diehard

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I have never understood maximum drop. Somebody please tell me how to get from top floor to bottom floor with drain. And not exceed the maximum? Whatever a maximum is. So many have tried to explain how water can outrun solids. But I run a plumb straight vertical pipe. Is that maximum? And newton says gravity acts equally on every object. The maximum really only apply to a vented arm over. That I know of. But if everything behind your slope is vented then let it fall.
I believe that reference is primarily a civil criteria. It is referring to horizontal piping(less than 45 degrees) And apparently it is related to limiting the Maximum velocity due to the concerns you mentioned about the liquid leaving behind the solids. I've seen references to max velocities being limited to anywhere between 10 degrees all the way up to 15 or 20 degrees.
EDIT: Oops not degrees, feet pet second velocities.
 
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FishScreener

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A sewer line is not a vacuum, and when they flow through the pipe, unless you have made a slurry out of the waste, the fluids outrun solids.

I was in Vegas, when the low flow toilets, and water conservation hit. (My younger brother still works for the Water Authority there.) in addition to the code mandated devices, they started installing all sorts of the water saving devices, dual flush, etc., that were hitting the market. The Water Authority would pay for projects, to decrease usage. The Hotels all incorporated the savings projects in to their regular cycle of remodeling. Most folks don’t know it, but the high dollar strip hotels, do complete remodels every year on the high end floors, and at least every three years for all guest areas. The big hotels have in-house crews of tradesmen, and do their own work, and it is a continuous process.

Within three months of installation, they had to start snaking the lines on the remodeled floors, because they were having the fluids out run the solids in the “horizontal” runs. They hadn’t changed the slopes, because when you had high volume fixtures, the code worked. But, no one had thought through the effect of cutting the water volume by over thirty percent. There wasn’t enough volume to flush the. Solids to the vertical stack.

We had physical models of sewer lines, made out of clear polycarbonate, set up at the university, and mixing up something called floop, to simulate solids. And, spent several months, flushing floop, down toilets, and watching it run down the clear lines, to determine how much slope you needed, to move the floop, consistently and get the solids to run all the way to the vertical stack. And the plumbing code for Clark County got modified.

The maximum vertical drop in a stack, is driven by the energy involved in the drop, the impact energy at the bottom of the drop, and how strong the waste lines are. If a slug of waste falls too far, it develops enough energy to start loosening, and eventually breaking the joint at the bottom.
 

Jamesplumbing06

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Ok I can see the utility side of it. I guess. My theories are not as justifiable as a college classroom experiments. But codes do come from somebody sitting around thinking of ways to go wrong. I just assume everybody showers after taking a floop and the rest of the upcoming water will push the floop down.
Always wondered if somebody spent the cash to test a bowling ball and feathers in a vacuum. Guess there is a dollar for everything lol.
 

Diehard

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The potential of lack of sufficient volumes of flushing water, in low flow toilets, was recognized during their design.
 

Twowaxhack

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Ironically, I believe that above was member "DIEHARD'S" last post before he passed away from cancer. He was one hell of a knowledgeable guy. RIP!
The old guys paved the path each generation it changes a little but stays the same in ways.

RIP
 
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