Pipe stuck in a pipe

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by rob cougham, Jun 12, 2019.

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  1. Jun 12, 2019 #1

    rob cougham

    rob cougham

    rob cougham

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    We have a set of semi-permanent rugby goal posts. The ground sleeve is an 3" diameter 36" deep aluminium tube set in a 30" diameter by 48" deep concrete casing. The posts (aluminium) have a 2 5/8"~ OD sleeve that slides into the sleeve. Well... the boys went to remove them for painting and the post was stuck... they ended up breaking off the post inside the pipe. I'm trying to find a way to remove the inner tube.

    Specifically a tool that would rip pipe lengthwise: ( my mind sees a tool with a cutting wheel similar to a tubing cutter but the wheel is on the outside... on a stick)

    Any ideas would be appreciated!
     
  2. Jun 12, 2019 #2

    frodo

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    Just call me Macgyver Professional Supporting Member

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    start over

    abandon the 2 - 3'' sleeves. they are toast
    install 2, new sleeves, and leave them approx 12'' above the ground
    the new goal post insert needs to be the same material as the sleeve
    if you use a steel sleeve and aluminum insert you are begging the gods of rust to play havoc
    as you insert the sleeve, liberally,coat inside the sleeve and insert with axle grease

    maintenance. pull the posts twice a year, re-grease, reinstall.

    OR

    install 4'' pvc 3' deep. with a screw plug [clean out] at grass level

    drop your posts in when you play and remove them when you are not
     
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  3. Jun 12, 2019 #3

    Diehard

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    No ideas on the tool type you mention.
    May I assume the that the 2-5/8" OD alum post broke at the top of the sleeve?
    Of course I have no idea as to just how stuck it is but was of trying to think of a way to twist it loose. If that's at all possible.

    Not sure but I think the thread OD on a 2" black iron may be something that could be force screwed into the ID of the alum post. The OD of a black iron pipe would be about 2-3/8".
     
  4. Jun 12, 2019 #4

    frodo

    frodo

    frodo

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    depending on the debth of the post in the sleeve
    a sawall blade is 12'' long and could be used to split the pipe
    i am not aware of any blades that are longer
     
  5. Jun 12, 2019 #5

    rob cougham

    rob cougham

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    A bit more info: All the materials are aluminium (Post and sleeve). Out of the 4 posts (rugby goal posts are an "H" style). 2 of the posts were pretty stuck in the ground. They managed to get one of them out by spinning it with a big pipe wrench and cheater.

    There is absolutely no corrosion on any of it. There was some very minor abrasion on the sleeve walls, most likely from sand and the movement of the posts in the wind.

    Good point on the grease: we didn't grease them last time we put them in. (2 years ago.) Regret is real!

    The long sawzall blade is about the only idea I have right now. I tried a short sawzall blade: made cuts 4" down. Peened over a leaf. Drilled a hole. Bolted a cable through the leaf and winched it up to a tripod. Only succeeded in pulling the bolt through the leaf.

    I kinda think that a direct vertical force will need to be multiple times what is required than a twisting force. But I have no idea how to apply a twisting force on the pipe. (I thought of an easy out but couldn't find one in this size.) If I relieved it down 12" that might relieve enough friction that it can pull out. But it will also muck up the pipe to the point where other options are off the table.
     
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  6. Jun 12, 2019 #6

    SGkent

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    weld a cap or thread a plug into the inner pipe. Drill a hole in it before you do and thread a good quality Eye bolt thru it with a good nut behind it. Use an engine hoist to pull it straight up. I am also visualizing rock climbing cams that might fit and lock in that an engine hoist might be able to pull on. I don't know their weight limit but a couple steel wedges with serrations, and a central wedge to spread them that an eye is bolted thru would work. You must pull 100% straight up. Any side load won't work like your leaf tear.
     
  7. Jun 12, 2019 #7

    SGkent

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    there are some sanding drums that are around that size. The are made of rubber and they have a hole in the center. You slide the sanding drum over the rubber center then tighten and the rubber expands. If you can find a couple about the right size at say HF and put all thread in them, you might be able to tighten the rubber part to where they really grab the aluminum from the inside but without expanding the inner aluminum pipe. Hook the all thread to a puller that pulls straight up and go for it. Otherwise I see a concrete coring company in your future.
     
  8. Jun 12, 2019 #8

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    Did you try a piece of threaded 2" black iron pipe as an easy out, as I suggested in post #3 above?
    But like I said, I'm not sure of the OD of the pipe thread vs the ID of the alum sleeve. Thought it might be close.
     
  9. Jun 15, 2019 at 5:14 PM #9

    rob cougham

    rob cougham

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    The ID of the inner sleeve is 58MM or just a hair or 2 1/4" That's a great idea about 2" black iron pipe: I'll pick up a scrap and test it.
    Also a good idea on the sanding drums: I might try that first as it won't ruin anything if it fails.

    I talked to a welder buddy about welding in a plug: He basically gave me the no-go.

    Thanks for the ideas!
     
  10. Jun 15, 2019 at 9:12 PM #10

    SGkent

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    you could also split the iron pipe 3 ways at the bottom couple inches with a saws all or dremel cutoff wheel. Use a steel or aluminum cone with a hole in the center for a piece of all thread. nut on bottom, big thick washers on top tighten pushing the iron pipe out. If you use an all thread size that is hardy and that screws into a slap hammer you might be able to slap hammer it out.But if it expands the pipe you are screwed and you won't be able to get the tool out if it doesn't work. But here is an idea that I am pretty sure would work.

    I have a tool that is used to pull out bearings from VW bus front torsion tubes. is oval round in shape so it can go into the tube at an angle. The center has a slot. A slap hammer rod goes thru it so you push it past the bearing or sleeve you want to remove. Then when you bring it back it flattens out and you can slap hammer the bearing or bushing out. This tool is about 3/8" steel and the diameter is less that the outside tube so it doesn't get wedged in the torsion tube. The only drawback to using something like that would be there has to be room at the bottom to go past the end and come back. Also the inner tube has to be thick enough the plate will grab under it. If there is room under it you could make a tool by getting a piece of steel say 3/8" or there abouts. Something 1 1/2 X 1" then grind the corners and the backside a bit to help it be able to rotate flat. Drill a hole in the center for a good piece of heavy all thread, slot it a little so it fits - use one of the outer tubes the post came out of to make sure it slides freely when at 90 degrees. Meaning it has to fit behind the inner tube and lock but clear the outer tube. Then put a weight of some kind on the all thread, another plate and nut. There is your slap hammer. To get it out if it doesn't work use a long stiff wire to push the tool at an angle again and lift it out. Try that if the rubber disks don't work.

    This is what the tools look like that go into the torsion beam to pull the bearings. I borrowed the photo from thesamba site where I am a member.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019 at 9:17 PM

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