PEX fittings reducing flow - Dog Bath Tubs

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Tuck8, Mar 14, 2019.

Help Support Plumbing Forums by donating:

  1. Mar 14, 2019 #1

    Tuck8

    Tuck8

    Tuck8

    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    Hi,

    My name is Tucker and I own a pet store here in Utah.

    We have 3 self-serve dog wash tubs that use a lot of water. The tub manufacturer made sure my contractor used 3/4" lines to the tubs. My contractor ended up using PEX and quite a few "T" and 90 degree fittings on the PEX. The black plastic fittings fit inside the PEX and no doubt restrict the diameter of the piping.

    When we have all three tubs going, our water flow/pressure is GREATLY reduced.

    I have considered replacing all of the black plastic fittings with sharkbite connections, since the sharkbite goes OVER the piping and may not reduce flow.

    Is this a good plan to remedy and free up some water flow?
     
  2. Mar 14, 2019 #2

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2017
    Messages:
    995
    Likes Received:
    195
    Location:
    North reading, Mass.
    It's a matter of how much is to blame on your plastic PEX fittings vs. marginal water service pressure, etc.
    Ideally, I like to look at the system in terms of how much water(flow and pressure) would deemed to be suitable for the 3 wash tubs vs. what's available at the supply feeding them. In other words, a look at what you may have to gain by reducing some of that friction loss.

    Are these tubs manufactured and sold as a unit? They must have a recommended pressure and flow requirement. Or on the other hand did the plumbing contractor have some involvement in its arrangement or did in just provide the water service to each?

    Would be nice to see the details of what is going on in terms of arrangement, number of fittings, lengths of tubing, valving, etc., etc.

    I'll stop here and not get too far ahead of myself.
     
  3. Mar 14, 2019 #3

    Tuck8

    Tuck8

    Tuck8

    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    Thanks for the response. The building is commercial use with 75 PSI - not sure flow. We use a shampoo/water mixer that needs 5 GPM to run, so 15 GPM at the minimum - above this would be ideal.

    The new PEX piping runs from the buildings existing copper line (looks to be 3/4 in) for about 10 feet, then "T's off to the water heater and continues to run for the cold line. Both lines are then run about 35 feet with 4-5 90 degree fittings. They are then reduced to 1/2" at the tubs.

    Since there is one 3/4 in. line feeding both the hot and cold with a small "T" fitting, could this point be the issue?

    When only one tub is on, the pressure and flow is great. But quickly drops when the second and third tub are turned on.
     

Share This Page