Not enough room for faucet ring

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hjsteffl

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We had countertops cut for a new vanity. Unfortunately, there doesn't appear to be enough room to thread the ring on the faucet and tighten the bolt in the holes for the faucet. The sink was cut too close to the wall as it seems. Any solutions or ways to rig it to be able to attach and tighten the faucet? I hope this makes sense as I'm NOT a plumber. Our plumber could not find a solution and the only possible fixture that might work is $400.
 

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Geofd

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I think your right ct18 I wonder if he can fit a Dremel tool up there
I wonder if he could talk to the faucet manufacturer and see what thread he’s working with maybe there is a smaller nut or order another set of locking nuts and modify what he already has
 

Geofd

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I wonder if he could talk to the faucet manufacturer and see what thread he’s working with maybe there is a smaller nut or order another set of locking nuts and modify what he already has
One of the pics looks like one of the nuts is already on so if he got his hand up there already he could get a dremel up there
 

Riickk

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I was going to say that the people who bored the holes have to make good, but, clearly, they did the best they could, holes are about as close to the sink as possible.

I *think* that top was designed to have a backsplash, which, installed butt to the top, would bring it far enough from the wall to easily install faucet(s).

Did you decide not to use a backsplash?, or company who sold/delivered top forget the splash, or am I 2,000% wrong....???
 

Jim Jensen

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could you possibly put a piece of matching counter material, against the wall behind the countertop, pushing the counter OUT from the wall, the thickness of the counter material....??? stopping the material at the bottom of the counter, going no further down in the back.... that is, IF it is possible to detach the countertop.....? In other words, it would just be a "backsplash" at the back of the counter, going up 4 - 6 inches or so.
 

Jeff Handy

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Take your plastic nut to Home Depot etc, and find something it screws onto, a faucet, pipe nipple, threaded valve etc.
Then look for a brass mounting nut with a much thinner outer ring.
If you can’t find one, look online, based on the thread size of whatever you found that your plastic nut screws onto.
Then find some metal washers that fit nicely over that same shaft you already found that fits your plastic nut.
Take a hacksaw and saw off enough metal on two opposite sides so that the trimmed washer will cover the sink hole on two sides, but will be skinny where needed at the wall and behind the sink.
 

Jeff Handy

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Now good luck getting a wrench up there.
It would have been better if the faucet could have been installed on the countertop before the counter was dropped on.
But then you would still be screwed when it came time to change it out someday.
 

breplum

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I've seen this so many times.
I will refrain from castigating in this case. *!###...**!!!!!
You may find a faucet that has the ability to be tightened from the top, but I sincerely doubt you will find anything that will work.
With over 45 years of experience I surmise from the pictures: Tear it out and start over.
 

Jeff Handy

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Maybe a home made tool could do it.
Such as a section of 2 inch diameter copper pipe.
Slightly bend in or squeeze two opposite sides to create flats to grab the nut.
A crude version of a fancier tool that I have, made by Ridgid.
 

Riickk

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... *!###...**!!!!! ......
With over 45 years of experience I surmise from the pictures: Tear it out and start over.
The more I look at the top / sink combination, the more I think it's made wrong. The OP ought to check it's dimensions against manufacturers sample top.
Bet you find the undermount(?) or is it cast in(?) sink is made too far toward wall side
 

Geofd

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Maybe a home made tool could do it.
Such as a section of 2 inch diameter copper pipe.
Slightly bend in or squeeze two opposite sides to create flats to grab the nut.
A crude version of a fancier tool that I have, made by Ridgid.
You might be on the right track I think you could take the screws out and maybe use them as your tightening points
I’m not sure you would evenneenthe screws anyway but he wanted to use them just don’t force it
 

Geofd

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You might be on the right track I think you could take the screws out and maybe use them as your tightening points
I’m not sure you would evenneenthe screws anyway but he wanted to use them just don’t force it
I have made home made wrenches for different faucet nuts
 

Jeff Handy

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A wrench like this could grab a thin brass nut as I described above.
Not sure of what exact size you would need.
This is a 1 1/2 inch water heater element wrench.
There are similar wrench sets made for recessed shower valve removal.

You would have to attach something to make it longer, or just grab it with vice grips where you can get to it.

Or make your own similar tool, by modifying the end of the appropriate diameter and length of regular old copper pipe.

31F7EE7F-404B-4356-9865-9FB427C317C5.jpeg
 
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Jeff Handy

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My motto is, “If you can see it, you can find a tool to move it, twist it, or grab it”.

It might crush your soul trying to figure out how, but there is always a way.
 

Jeff Handy

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If that existing mounting nut he is showing is plastic, it could be trimmed way down on a belt sander or whatever.

Then as Geofd said, a homemade tubular tool could be made to engage the screw holes.

A copper pipe with two finish nails epoxied on, or use a dremel to carve away enough to create two raised contact points.
 

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