New bathtub hitting copper spout?

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Devan

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Hi all, new DIYer here and we have been trying to install a new bathtub to replace our old one.

We have placed the new bathtub in (Delta 400 Curved tun) which is 18 inches high, but the copper pipe for the bathtub spout is hitting the new bathtub. We are not sure how to tackle this. Can a plumber raise the copper pipe? We are looking for the most cost effective approach of course but we are new DIYers and this hasn’t been as easy as we thought it was going to be! 56FF4BB3-7F5A-4276-95D4-574618F15F2D.jpeg 2864D9F7-7344-4870-94AE-697BD674D3F5.jpeg 552E4CDF-E845-487B-BB4A-366BFB43CAE7.jpeg We did cut a section of the tub flange to get the tub in but noticed it touching the tub even after we did that. Any help/guidance would be greatly appreciated!
 

havasu

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IMHO, you have the wall exposed, so why not spend a few hundred and replace that entire valve. You will regret not doing so at a later time.
 

Devan

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That’s what we will most likely do (replace the entire valve) assuming it isn’t too much more. How long would a job like that usually take a professional to do? I know prices vary but is this a $300 job or $900? We are new at this and understand cutting it was not a good idea. Is it going to cause huge problems for us later?
 

Diehard

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The plumber will know that typically the exit of the tub spout must be at least 1" above the top of the the tub height.

You may also want to consider your proposed wall tile and placement, so as to coordinate it with the final spout height.

EDIT: With what is left for a lip height where the tub was cut, I wouldn't anticipate that it would cause any huge problems for you later.

EDIT2: You also may want to look ahead to what is planned for a spout. New or existing? You want to make sure the existing pipe with threaded adapter is acceptable for any new spout you may propose.
 
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Riickk

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As an aside, just cutting and raising the pipe to the spout may not be a good idea.
Some manufacturers specify a minimum distance for the drop to the spout, so the shower and diverter will work correctly.
Also, no matter whether you use current valve, or a new one, have the two copper pipes that feed the valve, strapped down to some wood, not hanging loose between the framing as currently.
In addition, decide if you want to change height of shower arm - easy to do when everything exposed, and, that the fitting for the arm ( "drop ear elbow") is also screwed down.

2 shower fitting.jpg
 

Jeff Handy

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If you saved that piece of flange, glue it back in while you can, or have the plumber glue it in, maybe with something else thin and wider glued behind it as a backup.

You don’t want shower water getting under your tile and running off the tub deck right there.

And yes, time for a new valve, and fasten everything to framing or blocking.
 

Riickk

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Whoops... If you're really new at this, question:
Did the tub come with instructions on how to attach and support it?
Is it supposed to simply be screwed into the studs, or, is the installer supposed to support the under edges with wood blocking? I remember installing a plastic bath tub where they called for a structural foam pad to support the bottom.
 

Devan

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The instructions say to screw it to the studs. It doesn’t look like we need to add anything to the bottom, unless the subfloor is not level. In that case we would need to add mortar. We did purchase the tub/shower surround wall set so that would lay on top of the tub once it’s screwed in.

On another note, the sides of the tub fit well, but we do have a large gap between the flanges and studs at the back wall of the tub. There really isn’t any way to even screw the tub to the studs because it’s just way too large. The instructions say the gap must be less than 1/8” so we are trying to figure out what to do there.

We do have a plumber coming out this morning to give us a quote for raising the pipe or just simply replacing the entire valve. I will probably ask him if it makes sense to move the drain closer to the wall so we can scoot the tub back and screw it to the studs.

Edit: We did save the piece we cut, so we will ask about that, as well!
 

Riickk

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You can always sister the studs on the back. Place new studs alongside existing, and anchor to top, and thru to adjacent stud. Be sure the new sisters are plumb. (Straight up and down, not angled)
 

Jeff Handy

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You can also just tack on something like lath or other material of proper thickness, onto the face of the studs that are too far away.
Or plywood ripped down into strips.

You might end up with a gap at the top of the surround, you could fill that with something else creative.
 

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