Need Advice on What to do with Leaking Spigot (pics)

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Tony1, May 21, 2019.

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  1. May 21, 2019 #1

    Tony1

    Tony1

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    I have an old leaking spigot that I was trying to remove the value and replace the seals. I can't get it unscrew. I don't know what all my options are at this point. This is my first home and I've never dealt with this before.

    At first I thought I only needed to open the spigot value and then unscrew the nut behind it, but then I noticed it's the bolt behind the nut that connects to the base. If I continue trying to get it unscrew, does anyone have any suggestions on getting it off - sprays, oils? I don't want to snap the pipe and then have a bigger problem on my hands.

    If I should just replace the spigot, it looks to be soldered on from both sides. I'm not sure how to go about doing this. I've seen some Youtube videos, but most of them are (best-case scenerio) very straight forward with clearance to work with the pipes. To get the elbow picture (attached), I had to cut out some drywall in a closet just to get to it. If replacing the whole thing is the better option, how should I go about it?


    Spigot - Copy.jpg Spigot elbow - Copy.jpg
     
  2. May 22, 2019 #2

    Geofd

    Geofd

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    if that nut is the only thing that moves loosen it the stem mat thread right out you will see a washer and a screw holding the washer in the 2nd pic really doesn't show much other then the 90
     
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  3. May 22, 2019 #3

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    I'm assuming it's the packing nut(nut closest to the handle if there's more than one) that he can't get off. But in any case, that's the nut that should be removed.
    What you have to remember is to put a wrench on the valve body to hold it from being twisted when applying rotational force to the nut wrench.
     
  4. May 23, 2019 #4

    Tony1

    Tony1

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    Thank you for the replies. I uploaded a picture (below) labeling the packing nut as #2 and the other one I'm talking about as #1. I was able to unscrew #2. I opened the valve all the way. Unscrewed #2 and I thought I would be able to pull the valve and stem out, but it's enclosed by another housing which is screwed by #1 to the base of the spigot. #1 is the one I can't get out.

    Like Diehard mentioned, I put a plumber's wrench (they look like a cross between plumber's and pliers wrench) on the base while using a crescent wrench on #1. I'm a big guy weighing about 230lbs and I can't get the thing to budge. I bought a spray yesterday to see if I'll loosen it and I'll be trying again today. Am I using the wrong tools or is there something better that would help getting this damn thing unscrewed?
    Spigot - Copy.jpg

    Yea, sorry about the elbow pic. That's how much room I have. The viewpoint is just a cutout from drywall in a closet. The pipe going up goes about a foot then turns left to a water valve that only controls the water to the spigot. I got that going for me.
    elbow.jpg

    If I'm replacing the whole thing, am I cutting both ends of the 90 joint, pull the valve out from the outside and soldering a new copper elbow to the interior pipe and valve pipe? If that's right, how do I make up for the different in length when I connect the top pipe (shorter now that it's cut) to the elbow and to the pipe coming from the hole? The elbow won't align. What's the right thing to do?

    Sorry for the questions. I'm a noob when it comes to plumbing and it doesn't help that I'm a perfectionist, lol.
     
  5. May 23, 2019 #5

    House Doc

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    Good morning, My "go to" for removing rusty/corroded nuts etc. is PB Blaster. give the joint a blast and let it work for about an hour. "Tap" on the nut with a wrench or small hammer and give it another shot. The tapping helps the PB to penetrate. There are flats on each side of the valve body for a wrench. A large Crescent or even monkey wrench, to hold the valve from turning, and a good wrench on the nut and it should come loose. You could also try some heat on the nut. Not my first choice since heat can melt the washer or damage the packing. If worse comes to worse, and the valve is soldered to the pipe you can heat up the valve with a torch enough to melt the solder and pull it off. USE PLYERS... NOT HAND! (Don't ask) Remove the stem from new valve...clean...flux...and solder new one on. That little space between brick and valve should be enough to feed solder to joint. Let it cool, reassemble, and turn on water. Check for leaks and you're good to go.
     
  6. May 23, 2019 #6

    Diehard

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    Good info by House Doc!
    If you can manage it, tapping on the wrench that's on that #1 nut, is better than using shear strength.

    On another note. Can you actually see enough of that valve connection to determine that it is, in fact, soldered and not screwed?

    I kind of doubt you would be able to solder another valve on that if it can't be pulled out an inch or so.

    If you can't remove the stem, I would clear away that plaster or whatever it is from the inside to see just what's there.
     
  7. May 23, 2019 #7

    Geofd

    Geofd

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    have you tried to spin the whole valve off try pulling on the valve a little look between the brick and the valve there may be a copper adapter...like the other posters said brace the valve body put a small pipe wrench or a crescent wrench on the bigger nut and give it a wack with a hammer
     
  8. May 23, 2019 #8

    Geofd

    Geofd

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    I think if the valve body has flat sides its ment to be threaded on or off
     
  9. May 24, 2019 #9

    Diehard

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    If it is a threaded valve, then of course you must now keep the interior soldered elbow and connected pipe from twisting.
    You could have another person hold that wrench, however, you can't give it a wack with a hammer. you may get away with a series of reasonably substantial taps.
    Otherwise, in order to unscrew it, you'd have to get to the adapter and put the wrench there.

    Alternately, de-solder the elbow (if safe to do so), pull out hose bib and connected pipe, replace with new valve with attached pipe and solder a new elbow back on. The end.
     
  10. May 24, 2019 #10

    FishScreener

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    The #1 is flats on the valve body. #2 is the packing nut. If it is the packing nut which is leaking when the faucet is on you can turn the valve to the closed position. Then you can remove the packing nut, and renew the packing.

    If the valve is not shutting off all the way you will need to: Turn of the feed to the faucet, remove the handle, then remove the packing nut, and then put the handle back on and turn the valve as if your opening it. The stem and seat washer will come all the way out.

    You should then be able to remove the seat with a seat wrench, and replace it with a new one. Refresh the seat washer, and screw the stem back in. Renew the packing, and put the packing nut back on.

    You have renewed the faucet.
     
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  11. May 24, 2019 #11

    Diehard

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    Okay so you're saying that what OP is calling #1 nut is not a removable nut but part of the valve body.

    That does look like it could very well be the case. But I would have thought the OP would be able to see that.

    When zoomed way in, it does appear to show something that resembles a thread.
    Spigot - Copy.jpg
     
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  12. May 24, 2019 #12

    WyrTwister

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    Replace it .

    Wyr
    God bless
     
  13. May 24, 2019 #13

    sawguy50

    sawguy50

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    This^^^ if you can't solder, hire a plumber.
     
  14. May 24, 2019 #14

    WyrTwister

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    Could not tell from the photo id the faucet was sweat on or screw on ?

    If it was sweat on , after I removed it , I would sweat on a male adapter then install a screw on faucet .

    Wyr
    God bless
     
  15. May 24, 2019 #15

    Diehard

    Diehard

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    He doesn't say where he's located but if he had to disconnect from within the interior, I would update to a frost proof with built in vacuum breaker. Aren't vacuum breakers required on all hose bibs now? Don't like the screwed on version with locking screw.
     

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