Leaking Drain in Upstairs Shower

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by dbdezyne, Jun 7, 2012.

  1. Jun 7, 2012 #1

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    Recently found a leak in our ceiling and was able to trace it to the drain in the upstairs shower. The drain in the shower is a Caspers 101-P. My first suspicion is that the leak is coming from where the top of the drain flange meets the shower opening. There appears to be a very small gap there where I think water can get through. My question is this type of drain threaded or glued? If it is glued, then it appears that the whole shower has to come out, but if it is threaded, then maybe just the Caspers drain can be pulled and replaced. Any ideas or help would greatly be appreciated.
     
  2. Jun 8, 2012 #2

    phishfood

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    Either way, you will have to access the bottom of the shower base to remove the old drain. That is, if I understand you correctly that this is a fiberglass shower stall or shower base. These type drains are all secured to the shower by a large nut on the bottom of the shower base. Whether or not the drain glues to the pipe or uses a rubber compression gasket is a small matter compared to getting to the bottom of the shower.
     
  3. Jun 8, 2012 #3

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    Yes, this is a complete fiberglass stall. So, your take is that I've got to cut a hole in the ceiling to replace or repair the drain? I've seen a couple of videos where the drain is screwed in and the rubber gasket is replaced from the top, then the new drain installed. That was why I was asking if this would be a threaded drain.
     
  4. Jun 8, 2012 #4

    phishfood

    phishfood

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    The standard drain with a rubber gasket also has a large nut on the bottom that unthreads.

    However, I have seen one of our most experienced members, johnhh2o, post recently about a replacement drain that can be installed directly from the top. I have no experience with it, and cutting the old drain off, while doable, would still be a problem.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2012 #5

    johnjh2o

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  6. Jun 8, 2012 #6

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    Yeah, that's what I saw advertized. There is a back wall of the shower that I can get to. I was wondering if I could cut a small inspection hole at the bottom to see if that drain is threaded or not. If it is, then I may be able to get something in from that direction to loosen the nut and remove the drain without coming in from the bottom. Otherwise, this could be a complete shower removal.
     
  7. Jun 8, 2012 #7

    johnjh2o

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    Is the gap your seeing between the shower and the strainer or between the gasket and the strainer? If it's between the shower and the strainer the only fix is to replace the strainer. Coming in from the back wall will do nothing for you.

    John
     
  8. Jun 8, 2012 #8

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    I'll post a pic tomorrow that shows the gap.

    thanks
     
  9. Oct 11, 2012 #9

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    Finally got some time to look at this drain leak. Here are a couple of pictures of the drain. Basically, still not sure if this a threaded type that can be removed from the top. There looks to be some notches use for a grip, but again seeking some advice. Really trying to avoid a complete shower removal as this is on a second floor with no access to bottom. Possibly leaking around lip of strainer where it joins the enclosure, but even if so, not sure how to even make a good seal around that without actually removing it.

    photo.jpg

    photo1.jpg
     
  10. Oct 11, 2012 #10

    johnjh2o

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    Check the ring with the notches it should be tight. There is a gasket under the ring that seals the pipe to the strainer. Those notches are to tighten the ring onto the gasket.
    John
     
  11. Oct 11, 2012 #11

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    The ring appears to really be tight, almost like it has some glue around it. If I'm able to get it off, it is possible to replace it with a new strainer?
     
  12. Oct 11, 2012 #12

    johnjh2o

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    No. That ring is just to seal the strainer to the pipe. There is a large nut and washer that fastens the strainer to the shower. Sorry to say but you need access to the bottom of the shower to remove it. The only other way is to cut it out. The link I gave you in a previous post is to a strainer that can be installed from above the base. But it's not a job for DIY.

    John
     
  13. Oct 11, 2012 #13

    reedplumber

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    If that is 2" maybe the gasket itself has broken down or is t sealing if you can get the tension ring off the top you can replace it with a new one and possibly even a brass tension ring.
     
  14. Oct 12, 2012 #14

    PioneerPlumber

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    I have yet to run into a shower drain of this type that Leah's due to the compression gasket. My guess is that the leak I'd coming from the space between the underside of the flange on the drain assembly and the the shower pan. These types of shower pans should be set in a mortar bed. This will prevent flexing every time someone steps into the shower.

    John is right. You need to access the drain assembly from the bottom and replace with a new one. Also, figure out how to get mortar In between the pan and the floor after repairs have been made. I would use silicone to fasten and seal the new drain assembly to the shower pan. I hate plumbers putty...
     
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  15. Oct 12, 2012 #15

    dbdezyne

    dbdezyne

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    Well, as much as I hate it, I think I will be ripping it out rather than damaging my ceiling. It could be very well leaking around the flange and I might try the silicone if I can get enough around it. If that's not feasible then I'm looking at the Redi-Tile formed shower pan and tiling the shower. I'm sure I will against ask for some advice. Thanks for everyone's help.
     

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