Kitchen sink drainage question

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Natish3000

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I live in a rural area with a septic system and the house was built in the early fifties. Everything works fine except kitchen sink and dishwasher drain goes out the wall straight down into the ground and then runs under a concrete pad. Scoping has determined that the galvanized pipe Has Broken under the concrete.
It would be extremely costly to get to and fix this pipe. The outlet at the house is very accessible. My question as if I were to use PVC or abs to carry the water into a 4 foot long bye 3 foot wide by 3 foot deep Gravel pit would you foresee the small amounts of grease and food that would be swept down the drain causing issues? It would more than likely receive at Absolute maximum less than 5 gallons of water per day. It is a mix of clay and l o a m according to the survey and the Gravel Pit would be situated well above the water table. The plumber who ran the scope does not see it as being a problem. I just wanted to check and see if anyone here could offer and alternative or better solution that does not involve tying the pipe back into the septic system.
 

JG plumbing

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I think getting a small sewage ejection pump and pumping it to another pipe might be a better solution. If it is feasible that is.

If you need to do what you want to do I would not drain directly into the ground. Do a grease interceptor of some kind. Or just a smaller version of a septic system. One small enough to handle your needs.

I would want to be able to clean or pump the solids. They may not act as a septic system usually does. You ground will lose its permeablity by getting plugged up with solids and soap. You'll eventually have a mushy patch in your yard.
 
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Twowaxhack

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I live in a rural area with a septic system and the house was built in the early fifties. Everything works fine except kitchen sink and dishwasher drain goes out the wall straight down into the ground and then runs under a concrete pad. Scoping has determined that the galvanized pipe Has Broken under the concrete.
It would be extremely costly to get to and fix this pipe. The outlet at the house is very accessible. My question as if I were to use PVC or abs to carry the water into a 4 foot long bye 3 foot wide by 3 foot deep Gravel pit would you foresee the small amounts of grease and food that would be swept down the drain causing issues? It would more than likely receive at Absolute maximum less than 5 gallons of water per day. It is a mix of clay and l o a m according to the survey and the Gravel Pit would be situated well above the water table. The plumber who ran the scope does not see it as being a problem. I just wanted to check and see if anyone here could offer and alternative or better solution that does not involve tying the pipe back into the septic system.
5 gallons a day isn’t much water. I think you’ll be fine.,

You must have a high efficiency washer to wash clothes.
 

frodo

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As long as you do not have a garbage disposal then you will be fine
AND you fully understand that food and scraps DO NOT get tossed down the drain.
soapy water, which is called grey water can be daylighted on the ground in the yard.
BLACK water, which is human waste AND FOOD can not be deposited on the ground. It is a biological shitstorm that can grow weird stuff and kill your family

As long as we have this understanding of what can be drained and what can not. you are good to go.
grandma always used her empty coffee cans to pour grease into and she scraped the food off the plates into the trash can
the drain went out to the flower garden where she grew prize winning Roses
 

Twowaxhack

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I divert my washing machine water to a fiberglass pump basin that has a small float operated pump in it made by Ridgid.

This pumps to a 1.5” pvc pipe that laying behind some huge crepe myrtle trees that I planted years ago every 10’ on my property.

At each tree I cut in a tee and used bushings to regulate and even out the flow so the first outlet wouldn’t take all the water. Never any standing water, no smells.

The trees seem to love it, getting bigger and If for some reason the pump fails the water will overflow the basin and run into a flower bed. This flower bed is against the house so I don’t want water discharging there on a regular basis.

We wash clothes a few times a day.
 

JG plumbing

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I divert my washing machine water to a fiberglass pump basin that has a small float operated pump in it made by Ridgid.

This pumps to a 1.5” pvc pipe that laying behind some huge crepe myrtle trees that I planted years ago every 10’ on my property.

At each tree I cut in a tee and used bushings to regulate and even out the flow so the first outlet wouldn’t take all the water. Never any standing water, no smells.

The trees seem to love it, getting bigger and If for some reason the pump fails the water will overflow the basin and run into a flower bed. This flower bed is against the house so I don’t want water discharging there on a regular basis.

We wash clothes a few times a day.
How does the AHJ feel about this? I like the setup. I've heard of some dumb stories about jurisdictions claiming graywater belonging to them and not allowing many practicle setups.
 

Twowaxhack

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How does the AHJ feel about this? I like the setup. I've heard of some dumb stories about jurisdictions claiming graywater belonging to them and not allowing many practicle setups.
I have no idea. I didn’t ask their permission. No one knows but me. ✌
I had to do something my wife was washing clothes for two kids almost around the clock.,

Its slowed down now that they’re older but we still wash a lot.

We’re on septic so no ones getting the grey water back anyway and it’s all going in the ground just in a different place hand not going through the septic tank.
 
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Natish3000

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As long as you do not have a garbage disposal then you will be fine
AND you fully understand that food and scraps DO NOT get tossed down the drain.
soapy water, which is called grey water can be daylighted on the ground in the yard.
BLACK water, which is human waste AND FOOD can not be deposited on the ground. It is a biological shitstorm that can grow weird stuff and kill your family

As long as we have this understanding of what can be drained and what can not. you are good to go.
grandma always used her empty coffee cans to pour grease into and she scraped the food off the plates into the trash can
the drain went out to the flower garden where she grew prize winning Roses
Thanks. We have septic and already practice the no food/ grease rules. I was more concerned about the everyday grease in dishwater. After scraping and washing. And residual grease floating in water. I was PRETTY sure this would work. Just wanted some more informed opinions.
 

Natish3000

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5 gallons a day isn’t much water. I think you’ll be fine.,

You must have a high efficiency washer to wash clothes.
I do have HE washer but it won't be on this system. It's DISHwasher and kitchen sink. Plumber looked up dishwasher and it uses 2 gallons. I figure a sink half full is about 3 gallons. There would be very few times it would get more use than this.
 

Twowaxhack

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I do have HE washer but it won't be on this system. It's DISHwasher and kitchen sink. Plumber looked up dishwasher and it uses 2 gallons. I figure a sink half full is about 3 gallons. There would be very few times it would get more use than this.
Yah, I got crossed up and must’ve misread.
 

arctic bill

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I disagree with most of you, it is not grey water rather black water. If you read what was posted by JD plumbing it is black water. I know this very well.
I have a cottage up north and used to do the same thing , run kitchen water into the woods in a tank. I had an out house it was very remote northern hunting and fishing cabin . Well one day a municipal inspector came by , and explained that it was not allowed and that i was polluting the land and eventually the lake that i was on . I had to install a full septic system . ouch $15,000 later.
 

Twowaxhack

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I disagree with most of you, it is not grey water rather black water. If you read what was posted by JD plumbing it is black water. I know this very well.
I have a cottage up north and used to do the same thing , run kitchen water into the woods in a tank. I had an out house it was very remote northern hunting and fishing cabin . Well one day a municipal inspector came by , and explained that it was not allowed and that i was polluting the land and eventually the lake that i was on . I had to install a full septic system . ouch $15,000 later.
Aren’t you in Canada ?
 

PerplexedPlumber

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This would be considered black water here also. The only compromise I could get on grey water was for the line from dog-bathing, which would be OK to do above-ground (letting water flow onto lawn) anyway.
 
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