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Is this septic tank crumpling?

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AMC

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Hi, I had my septic tank pumped out and the man told me my tank is crumbling. Could you please take a look at the photo and give an opinion as to what is happening. When he poked the white part of the photo 1 to 3 inch pieces fell off.
Tank was put in 6 years ago. Kellogg Concrete made it in Westfield Ma.
We have hard water.
Do not have a water softener.
Have gas heat. Was told this could be the problem. How is that possible?
Thank you very much for your opinions,
Ann
 

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Jeff Handy

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Picture is too blurry and small to see anything.
Take more pics, some close and some wider angle.
Clean your camera lens, and add more light if possible.

I don’t see how gas heat could cause concrete corrosion.
Maybe he thinks the condensate from the furnace is corrosive?
 

FishScreener

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Looks like the concrete is crumbling To me. The furnace matters, because it it is a condensing heater, and you aren’t passivating the condensate, it is slightly acidic and will attack the concrete, as well as messing up the biome of the septic tank. The drain line from the condensate should run through a trap with a bunch of crushed limestone, to neutralize the acid.
 

Jeff Handy

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Human urine is usually slightly acidic.
Human feces is usually slightly alkaline.
Laundry detergent is fairly alkaline.
And toilet and shower/bath and laundry water dilutes them all.

I can’t imagine the low volume of furnace condensate destroying the concrete, or being a big factor in the ph balance in there.
Sounds like just a defective tank.

I had a house with a concrete tank, it was at least 70 years old when I moved out.
My whole neighborhood had old concrete tanks, no one ever had to replace one.

But experts will be weighing in with better knowledge than mine.

And both FishScreener and the septic guy thought it could be from the furnace, so I am still open to that possibility.
 

AMC

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Looks like the concrete is crumbling To me. The furnace matters, because it it is a condensing heater, and you aren’t passivating the condensate, it is slightly acidic and will attack the concrete, as well as messing up the biome of the septic tank. The drain line from the condensate should run through a trap with a bunch of crushed limestone, to neutralize the acid.
Thank you for replying. Is this a standard procedure for homes with gas heat and septic? Is this something the hvac person does or the septic company? Thanks. Ann
 

AMC

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Interesting article. I guess I will have my tank inspected. Also did you click on the photo. It's almost 2mb large.
 

fixitron

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A typical condensing boiler will produce roughly 1 gallon per hour of acidic (pH 4-5) condensate, if it is condensing and when running all of the time. If a boiler is running for 12 hours a day that is about 12 gallons of condensate going into a 1,000 gallon tank during the winter. That also assumes that a pH neutralizer was not installed (which I see too often around here). I have seen condensing boilers and water heaters draining untreated condensate onto the concrete floor of a basement, next to a floor drain. A few years later the iron bell trap is getting quite corroded but I have yet to see much damage to the concrete slab. Even the old steel tanks would take 40-50 years to rust out, and you are seeing this in only 6 years. In my opinion, the concrete in the tank is defective.
 

WyrTwister

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Around here , few homes have boilers , but some homes ( like ours ) have condensing gas fired furnaces . Typically , condensate from the A-Coil and the furnace is taken outside along with refrigeration lines and the water is run out onto the ground . Not down the drain . Is that an option with your house ?
 

AMC

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Do you have a condensing furnace? What type of water heater do you have? Post pics if possible
Around here , few homes have boilers , but some homes ( like ours ) have condensing gas fired furnaces . Typically , condensate from the A-Coil and the furnace is taken outside along with refrigeration lines and the water is run out onto the ground . Not down the drain . Is that an option with your house ?
Thanks you. I don’t know. I can talk to my hvac guy. We are putting in a new furnace soon.
 

AMC

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A typical condensing boiler will produce roughly 1 gallon per hour of acidic (pH 4-5) condensate, if it is condensing and when running all of the time. If a boiler is running for 12 hours a day that is about 12 gallons of condensate going into a 1,000 gallon tank during the winter. That also assumes that a pH neutralizer was not installed (which I see too often around here). I have seen condensing boilers and water heaters draining untreated condensate onto the concrete floor of a basement, next to a floor drain. A few years later the iron bell trap is getting quite corroded but I have yet to see much damage to the concrete slab. Even the old steel tanks would take 40-50 years to rust out, and you are seeing this in only 6 years. In my opinion, the concrete in the tank is defective.
Do you have a condensing furnace? What type of water heater do you have? Post pics if possible
Do you have a condensing furnace? What type of water heater do you have? Post pics if possible
Sorry I posted the pics under the wrong message.
 

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