Is this a pressure regulator

Discussion in 'General Plumbing Help' started by Ferenc, Jul 26, 2019.

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  1. Jul 26, 2019 #1

    Ferenc

    Ferenc

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    I have weak water pressure in my house and prior to installing a booster system, I want to check simpler solutions. Is this a pressure regulator/reducer? Do you know of it is adjustable or should I just replace it?
     

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  2. Jul 26, 2019 #2

    Diehard

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    No it is not a PRV(Pressure Reducing Valve).
    It is a check valve.
    Not sure why you would have a CHECK VALVE on what appears to be your main service line. Or is that your main service line? I thought I saw a piece of a water meter in the lower left.
    A 1/2" line from the meter is a bit on the small side and would contribute to lower pressure when flowing.
    I would try to get a static pressure(no-flow) reading, upstream of that check valve if possible. Then you could check it somewhere down stream of that check valve to see what you're dealing with. Low service pressure and/or excessive pressure losses when flowing.

    Even when planning to boost the service water pressure, you should have some idea of what that service is capable of providing when flowing. Won't get into the details now since it may not be a problem.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2019
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  3. Jul 26, 2019 #3

    Ferenc

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    It is my main line. That is the meter to the left. The overall pressure after the valve is a little over 30psi. I’m assuming going to 3/4 inch line would be an expensive job. Especially since it’s a two story house.
     
  4. Jul 26, 2019 #4

    Diehard

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    Not sure why you would have a CHECK VALVE on what appears to be your main service line.

    Wow! That is low. You lucky if you get any water up to the second floor while it's being used on the first floor.
    Is that downstream of the check valve?
    Do your neighbors have similar pressures?
    Have you contacted your water purveyor? They should know approximately what you should be getting for pressure, in case there is some restriction on there end.
    And while you're at it, ask them if you can get rid of that check valve.
     
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  5. Jul 26, 2019 #5

    CT18

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    30 PSI is freaking terrible for city pressure. What line is that check valve on, an outside hose bib.
     
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  6. Jul 31, 2019 #6

    Diehard

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    By the way...If that 30 psi is the static pressure(No flowing water), it won't improve with any size pipe. In other words, 30 psi static will be used up in friction loss when flowing and elevation head it must reach. A larger pipe size would only reduce the pressure loss due to friction of the water flow. The higher the flow, the higher the friction loss.

    What you need is a higher static pressure (or boosted pressure) before looking at what larger pipe sizes you would need.
     
  7. Aug 1, 2019 #7

    FishScreener

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    30-psi is the AWWA minimum recommended. And about 70-ft of head.

    That slanting disc check valve, could be broken, and only opening part way. Which could severely, limit the flow, and dynamic pressure.

    Also, the steel lines could be severely corroded on the inside, so that the internal diameter is severely restricted.
     
  8. Aug 1, 2019 #8

    Diehard

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    True, true and true. But Are you saying 30 psi static would not, in itself, be a problem?

    A restricted check valve does not lower the static pressure, of course.

    Forgot to ask OP if this problem has always existed or did it just start recently?
     
  9. Aug 1, 2019 #9

    RenewDave

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    Booster pump time. The one I just put in for a customer works like a champ.
     
  10. Aug 1, 2019 #10

    Diehard

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    What were the water service conditions and what were the specs on the pump installed?

    (A pressure booster pump should take into consideration the water service pressures available at various flows rates. A centrifugal pump should have a certain pressure provided on the suction side at various flow rates for proper operation. Referred to as Net Positive Suction Head[NPSH] required.)
     
  11. Aug 8, 2019 #11

    Ferenc

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    Pressure has always been low. There is an existing booster pump with no tank (discontinued flotec model)(also the reason for the check valve). It doesn’t work and is being bypassed. I have the water district coming out to check the static pressure and see if it’s something they can fix. Will come back with my progress. Thanks for the responses. What booster would you recommend if needed?
     
  12. Aug 8, 2019 #12

    Ferenc

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    What kind?
     
  13. Aug 8, 2019 #13

    Diehard

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    The Water District must check not only the static pressure but more importantly the flow pressure. If there was a restriction of some type on their service or at the meter, the static pressure wouldn't recognize that. It's not until it's flowing does a restriction affect the pressure. The Water District should know that but make sure they do it.

    As mentioned previously, to properly size and select a booster pump you should know what the pumps available suction pressure will be at a particular gpm. That will provide info on what you can expect for max. flow and pressure from the pump, in addition to preventing cavitation within the pump if it's not get enough suction pressure. (Referred to as NPSH.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
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  14. Aug 17, 2019 #14

    Ferenc

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    Water dept checked line. The pressure was around 42psi static. They flushed the meter and valve before the meter, pressure did not improve. Said it’s the norm because I am at higher elevation and near the water source. Not enough distance to build higher pressure. And the new code requires a double check valve after the meter. Amtrol a good booster system? 15 or 25 p? Thanks
     
  15. Aug 17, 2019 #15

    Diehard

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    Your initial "a little over 30 psi" vs their 42 psi is a substantial difference. Was there some flow taking place when you tested it?

    Did they check static again after they flushed the meter and valve? I hope the answer is "NO" but it wouldn't surprise me. As the flushing wouldn't have any impact on the static pressure. The flushing would only affect the dynamic or flowing pressure. REFER TO MY POST #13.

    As previously mention, proper selection of a booster pump system is somewhat dependent on the flow vs pressure available from the service.

    Have you looked at the brochures for the booster systems?

    Following copied from Amtrol's Installation brochure.
    "The AMTROL Pressuriser® should only be
    connected to a municipal, cold water supply, and
    in systems with a minimum pressure of 10 psig at all times, measured
    under flow
    at the tap closest to the location of the AMTROL Pressuriser®
    installation. Minimum supply line, meter and fitting size for the RP-10HP
    is 3/4", and for the RP-15HP is 1" and RP-25HP is 1 1/4"."

    Following copied from Amtrol's brochure.
    Taco Booster Pump Performance.jpg

    EDIT: The double check valve must be required due to the fact that you would be adding a pump to the system.

    Hopefully the water service available to you will not lose too much pressure when flowing. That has to be tested!
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
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