How was this older style of drain pipe typically held in place in the floor?

Discussion in 'Toilets and Sinks' started by mrblint, Sep 2, 2019.

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  1. Sep 2, 2019 #1

    mrblint

    mrblint

    mrblint

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    I need to replace an old drain pipe (late 1940s, early 1950s) which goes into a stub coming up through the tiled floor. The flange that screws down onto the trap has corroded and crumbled into small pieces. The drain pipe that fits into the stub pipe in the floor won't budge and I'm afraid to put much torque on it. The former owners of the house did not remove the tile floor but tiled on top of tile. Is it possible there's a set-screw holding the drain pipe in place in the stub pipe, which is now hidden below a layer of floor tile? How were these pipes typically held in place? Is it just a caulk or plumbers putty seal? Any special solvents available to loosen it up, if so?

    Bathroom Sink Drain Pipe.JPG
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2019
  2. Oct 14, 2019 #2

    TomFOhio

    TomFOhio

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    Its hard to tell but it looks like the pipe is soldered in. You can cut the chrome pipe a few inches above the brass
    piece and put a slip nut adapter there and then replace the rest of the chrome pipe. You can replace it with pvc
    if you want or stay with chrome.
     
  3. Oct 14, 2019 #3

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    A slip nut adapter would work, but might be kind of wobbly.

    This would give you a sturdier connection to a new section of pipe, after you make a cut three or four inches above the stub coming out of the tile.

    https://www.amazon.com/American-Valve-RNH40-No-Hub-Coupling/dp/B00SVYT6P2

    This link is just to show the type of coupling.
    Other companies, Fernco for example, also make these rubber couplings with a sturdy clamping system to support it.
     
  4. Oct 14, 2019 #4

    TomFOhio

    TomFOhio

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    Jeff, those couplings won't work on tubular pipe. If the slip nut adapter coupling is put on correct
    it will not wobble. Sometimes you have to use them.
     
  5. Oct 14, 2019 #5

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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  6. Oct 14, 2019 #6

    Jeff Handy

    Jeff Handy

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    As long as he is re-doing it, maybe he should add an air admittance valve, because he has an old S trap.
     

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