Help With Toilet Install - Supply Line Issue

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Justin Blasberg

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New to the group, wondering if there is a helpful hand out there for this issue. I replaced a toilet in my master on the 2nd floor of the house. All went fine except my new supply line is leaking. Water is seeping out of the space between the threaded bolt and the next piece of metal (part of the compression system I presume) regardless of what I do. I've tighten the threaded bolt (connected the water line) quite a bit without improvement. Cannot get this to stay water tight.

Previous plumber has told me pressure in the house is very high and recommended a pressure reducer, but haven't gotten it done yet. I tried not opening the valve all the way but it did not help.

Any advice? I have tried 2 different supply lines in the event the first was faulty, but no improvement.

Best,
Justin
 

Justin Blasberg

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Thanks for your message. I agree with the valve Half open pressure comment.

I have attached a picture of similar, this is not the exactly line. I am leaking at the joint between the threaded bolt and the next piece of metal. I have included the area within the picture as a rectangle. I am not leaking from the joint of the threaded valve and the water line.

Best,
Justin
 

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Jeff Handy

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Yes, post pics of what is leaking.

And which end is leaking?
Is it at the supply valve, or under the toilet?

Also, sometimes a leak can be sneaky, it might actually be coming from somewhere else, and only appears to be where you think the problem is

EDIT I see your pic now.
 

Justin Blasberg

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Thank you Jeff. I have attached a picture. both sides were leaking, although I think I had the toilet side taken care of. I tightened the toilet hand tight + half turn with a wrench. the other side, attached to the water supply, is where I'm really having the issue.

I believe the connection between the threaded bolt and the water supply line seems ok. The joint where the compression valve is seems to be my issue. I've tried 4 supply lines, all the same. I tightened the supply side initially hand tight + 1 turn, and then with leaking all the way tight. the leak is VERY slow, basically weeping.

JDB
 

Jeff Handy

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You might just have bought two bad supply lines.
But pbly not.

The male threads on the valve might be dirty or corroded, so the connecting nut can’t tighten all the way.
Or the rubber inside the connecting nut can’t seal properly because it is trying to seal against a pitted or dirty surface.

Or the leak actually is running down from above.

EDIT Sorry we are both posting over each other.
 

Jeff Handy

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You might be slightly ripping up the rubber inside the coupling nut that you are tightening.

Try gooping on some plumbing thread sealant (pipe dope) onto the threads, and a little blob inside the end of the hose, on the rubber seal.

It will lubricate everything so the rubber seal is less likely to bind and rip, and also will seal a very tiny gap, and will also lubricate the threads which will let you safely tighten it more.
 

Jeff Handy

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That joint that you are talking about is never water tight until the coupling nut is properly tight.

The coupling nut does not make the seal.
The seal is made by the end of the supply hose squishing firmly against the flat face of the threaded portion of the valve.
The coupling nut just does the squishing together of those two surfaces.
 

Diehard

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As Jeff mentioned, it's the surface between the o-ring inside the hose nut and the end of that male threaded valve connection, that's suppose to make the seal. (The thread is a straight thread and not tapered.)
If you haven't done anything yet, you want to look closely at the end of that valve threaded connection to insure a nice flat surface, as Jeff warned about.
 

TomFOhio

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Justin where are you getting your toilet supply lines? Go to a local plumbing supply house if you have one and get
a good supply. You definitely have a bad supply line. Don't think its the valve.
 

Jeff Handy

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Just FYI, whenever I tighten these flex lines, I grip the line tightly with one hand while tightening the coupling nuts on either end.

So the hose can’t spin as I am tightening.

And I get the rubber inside a little bit wet first.

I just have an instinct that if the hose is rotating, it is damaging the rubber seal.

Mine do not ever leak, except many years ago when I overtightened and cracked the plastic nut under a toilet fill valve.
 

Mikey

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I just had a stainless steel braided line fail internally. Water was seeping out the braid and eventually dripping off the stop. 30+ year-old line, replaced both it and its mate.
 
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