Help Wire Taco 006 circulator pump

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Andrei

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TomFOhio

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If the old pump was tied into the smaller wires then the new one will do the same. If needed get some smaller wire nuts. Is
this pump for potable water?
 

Jeff Handy

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Those thin wires look like low voltage wires, like from a thermostat.

I think they would go to a relay, which would then send 115 volts to the pump.
 

Diehard

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I was about to ask, what are those wires coming from?
Are they coming from some type of relay or timer or control box?
Are you sure they were connected to the previous pump?
Granted it doesn't take much of a wire for the 0.51 amps that pump draws.
Did you happen to check the voltage on those wires?

Looking at your older post I think I found my answers.
Looks like that pump was plugged into the wall with an attached control box to accept what looks like maybe thermostat wires.old pump.jpg
 
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PlumbGate

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That pump says 115 volts on it which is standard household wiring and not low voltage. You say "new" pump. Was there a pump before this one? Those pumps usually have a device that goes under a sink that allows the hot to circulate through the cold when the thermostat in the device is too cold. Do you have those under any sinks? There could be more than one.
 

Jeff Handy

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Based on the background image, it is a hot water circulator pump.

But it could also be using water heater to heat radiators.

Those pumps need 14 ga wire at least.

Those little wires look like approx 18 gauge.

Sometimes they run 24/7, and sometimes just on demand from a thermostat.
If they run from a thermostat, there should be a relay that the thermostat controls, which then sends out 115 volts to the pump.
 

Diehard

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Yup...Looks like you got a different version of that same size pump.
006-B4-3.jpg
EDIT: Or you have another pair of wires you have to connect to. No instructions with that pump?
 
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TomFOhio

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Not use to seeing a taco pump with low voltage wires going to it. There probably out there though.
 

TomFOhio

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By the looks of your picture you need a pump with that box attached to it. Did you get the exact model number off of
your set up.
 

Andrei

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Yup...Looks like you got a different version of that same size pump.
View attachment 22424
EDIT: Or you have another pair of wires you have to connect to. No instructions with that pump?
Thank you for the reply, no instructions were included.. its the same type of pump, except this one is bronze rather than stainless steel.. I've opened the previous pump box, and this is what's inside of it.. should I try to use these parts? (outlet cable, etc..?)

 

Andrei

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Based on the background image, it is a hot water circulator pump.

But it could also be using water heater to heat radiators.

Those pumps need 14 ga wire at least.

Those little wires look like approx 18 gauge.

Sometimes they run 24/7, and sometimes just on demand from a thermostat.
If they run from a thermostat, there should be a relay that the thermostat controls, which then sends out 115 volts to the pump.
The pump is used to circulate hot water to a furnace in the ceiling... I've replaced it with the same type of pump, but a slightly different model.. internals are completely different than the previous one. It was also powered by a outlet cord + those two wires..
 

Jeff Handy

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You should hire a pro to hook that up.
It does not seem like you have the necessary experience with parts like those.
I think you are better off paying someone to do it right.
And you won’t get electrocuted.
 

wood4d

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Jeff is right. you need a relay to run that pump. The wire on the circ are 110 volt and the small gauge wire is 24v control wiring. I have not seen a circ. hooked up like this without a relay. You can mount a relay on the wall and power it and use the relay to control the pump on/off. The new circ you have is usable but someone rigged up the old one. It looks dangerous to me.
 

Diehard

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Okay, so the old unit had a built in relay for control wire(probably (24 volt) to switch 120 volt, to power the circulator, on and off.
The new unit apparently doesn't include the required relay.
Taco makes and sells many types of relays, specifically for that pump.
As already mentioned, contact Taco and discuss the issue with them. They will advise you of your options and likely steer you in the correct direction for what ever way you prefer to go.

I would double check the control wires voltage and its assumed source, in the mean time.
 
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Andrei

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Sounds good, thanks for all the reply’s.. I will contact Taco and see what they say.. will try to post the solution once I get it figured out..
 

Andrei

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I was browsing a website that sells this type of pump.. saw someone in the comments saying they had an exactly the same pump, it failed, and replaced with the exact same model.. here is their original review + wiring diagram..

Original in-line pump lasted 15 years and replacing it was easy and required no plumber. Just a matter of unscrewing the housing off the line and replacing with new pump which was a great price and the customer service from TACO was incredible. The tech answered all my questions both on the phone and the emails. He even offered to walk me through the wiring (pump has to be wired to electric cord that was on other pump) if needed. I would recommend this item-- and I would DEFINITELY recommend Tacos service.”

Tell me if this photo looks right to you guys..

 

Jeff Handy

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Does not look right for your situation.

That pump in the latest pic is being set up to run continuously.

Your pump for your hot water heat needs to be controlled by a thermostat, so it needs a relay.

Hire a plumber or heating contractor to do it.
 

Andrei

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Does not look right for your situation.

That pump in the latest pic is being set up to run continuously.

Your pump for your hot water heat needs to be controlled by a thermostat, so it needs a relay.

Hire a plumber or heating contractor to do it.
Hello Jeff, thank you for your reply. Out of curiosity (trying to learn), why would I need a thermostat?

Also, I have a closed loop system that flows hot water to the ceiling furnace and back to the water heater.. would running the pump continuously affect the plumbing in any negative way?

thanks in advance!
 
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