Heat Pump/Hybrid Electric Water Heater

Discussion in 'Water Heaters and Softeners' started by DEcosse, May 25, 2019.

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  1. May 25, 2019 #1

    DEcosse

    DEcosse

    DEcosse

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    I'm looking for a narrow diameter heat-pump style of electric water heater 40 or 50 gall (I also have a second, tankless heater, which supplies the master bath).
    I only recently replaced my heater a few months ago, however it was done on emergency over a weekend after original started leaking
    My cabinet is quite small - 24" deep x 25" wide (height is not really an issue) - the replacement heater I purchased is a Rheem Performance 40 gal 'Tall' heater with only 19-1/4" diameter and used a 22" pan - that is best I could do 'across the counter' and even then had to drive 30 miles to a store which had in stock!

    I haven't really been able to find a similar size of heat-pump style - narrowest I have found so far is the Aerotherm RE2H50S10 at 21-3/4" - I can possibly shoe-horn that in (although think a 24" pan is going to be bit of a squeeze - possibly can do something custom for the pan)

    Does anyone know of any manufacturer with something smaller (narrower) with heat-pump capability?
     
  2. May 25, 2019 #2

    breplum

    breplum

    breplum

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    Just to confirm, I presume you want a heat pump because you have or are planning to have PV solar electrical so you want "free" hot water.
    NorCal electric rates do not make sense for most consumers vs. gas unless they have PV production to spare. Gas is still cheaper by far under any other circumstances. Avg. monthly cost to run a gas tank WH is only about $20.
    Also, you wouldn't ever want to put a heat pump WH in a conditioned living space due to noise, and heat production.
     
  3. May 25, 2019 #3

    DEcosse

    DEcosse

    DEcosse

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    Thank you for your reply, which I'm sure was well intended.

    I'm an engineer and consequently am extremely analytical :D

    I am considering a heat-pump for the savings over the conventional electric water heater and the simple install, replacing essentially same from a facilitization perspective - I understand the cost advantages of gas tankless, but the gas plumbing and more significantly the exhaust venting in that location (interior wall, high ceiling, tile roof) are not worth the additional expenditure IMO (at least not to me, relatively short term) - as I said I do have a gas tankless gas system for my master system, which is the main water user anyway. If I already had gas in the location I want to use, I would undoubtedly go that way.

    From a unit cost perspective, the appliances themselves (a quality gas tankless vs heat-pump electric system) are not that dissimilar - the heat pump maybe a little more in that regard.
    But the installation cost (in this instance) for the gas appliance is going to be significantly more.

    Also, respectfully, I'm not sure you understand how a heat-pump actually works?
    It does not PRODUCE heat (well not externally anyway) - it is REMOVING heat from the air around it, so if anything it actually aids cooling to the local environment. Think about it - If it were heat PRODUCING (externally) it would actually be self-sustaining .... Now such a device really WOULD be free :D
    Here's some reading material for you - https://www.energydepot.com/RPUcom/library/WATER004.asp
    The very first paragraph:
    Nor are they particularly noisy

    https://www.contractormag.com/best-...and-tips-when-selling-heat-pump-water-heaters

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Il9f1kDFLs

    The electric system serves the kitchen and guest bathrooms, but the latter are quite rare use. My $$$ savings are unlikely to be high (although the suggested 60-75% probably still applies) since its usage is relatively low - but of course we all know that a tank system is using power even when you don't pull any water from it!!

    One additional reason for considering is home-resale value with the prospect of potentially marketing in the next 12 months or so - it's not like the home value goes up necessarily, but any energy saving devices are certainly viewed favourably by potential buyers and I think this meets the criteria at a lower expenditure vs tankless gas for that installation location

    So thank you for your suggestions, but my questions are related purely to electric options, in this instance.
     

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