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Guidance on installing a CSV to existing system.

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sarg

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Got everything ready to replace the pictured system I put into the house in 2006. This time I'm putting in a 10" shorter Rheem heater with a 20 gal. Dayton steel pressure tank. I've acquired all new attachments for the Dayton tank and the "T" piping from the tank will be very similar to the picture .... with the exception of moving the turn off ball valve on the pictured right side from vertical to horizontal (attached directly to the T with the elbow moved to the right side). I've been reading all the benefits of a CSV valve in such a system.
Looking at the schematics on the cyclestopvalve.com website it appears like I could "simply" replace the check valve position on the left side with a CSV1A valve onto the tank "T" and then attach the check valve with a short 1" nipple to the CSV ( before the well input piping on the left side).
Hoping then I could set the CSV at about a constant 45 psi. I do not want to exceed the 50 psi because of my poly-B piping.
Is this feasible and is the CSV1A the appropriate valve ?

W Heater.JPG
 
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Valveman

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You can install the CSV1A in place of that check valve as the check valve needs to be removed anyway. Or you can install the CSV1A anywhere in that 1" poly pipe coming up to the tank from the pump side. Setting the CSV1A at 45 PSI to use with that size tank and a 30/50 switch is correct, and that is all the pressure the house pipe will see. However, you will have a hundred PSI or so (depending on the pump size) on the pipe before the CSV1A, but it looks like 160# pipe and you will be fine.
 

sarg

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The CSV1A is ordered and once again ...... Thank You for your guidance.
 

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Looks really good! But the proof is in how you like the water pressure?
 

sarg

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The installation adventure now looks like this coming Friday. I'll report back when we get back to "normal". The cold water nipple on the current heater seems to be leaking a little more each day & I'm replacing the "absorption" towel with more frequency ............... all to say I'd better not procrastinate much longer.
 

sarg

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This is where Mr. Austin's expertise comes into play. I'm guessing he can advise the best valve for the application and possible problems to anticipate.
 

Valveman

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As long as you do not have any water lines or hydrants outside before the pipe comes into the house, then yes the CSV1A would go where the blue Pex line is. You could install the CSV on either end or in the middle of that blue pex line. Pump size and static water level will determine how much pressure is on the line prior to the CSV, but 125 to 175 is average.
 

sarg

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Almost complete with only one leak noted so far. Just working on getting the CSV set where I want and very small adjustments in the Square D switch. The switch was not set at 30-50 out of the box so I'm carefully moving the range up a tad.

Now tomorrow I have to drain the pressure tank and pull it out far enough to remove the feed pipe ... take off the CSV and reassemble .... this time I'll do about 6 or seven wraps of the .0035 mill Teflon tape. What I initially thought was condensation is just a fitting not tight enough.
In the total scheme of things I should be glad that's my only problem.


.IMG_0178.JPG
 
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Valveman

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Almost complete with only one leak noted so far. Just working on getting the CSV set where I want and very small adjustments in the Square D switch. The switch was not set at 30-50 out of the box so I'm carefully moving the range up a tad.

Now tomorrow I have to drain the pressure tank and pull it out far enough to remove the feed pipe ... take off the CSV and reassemble .... this time I'll do about 6 or seven wraps of the .0035 mill Teflon tape. What I initially thought was condensation is just a fitting not tight enough.
In the total scheme of things I should be glad that's my only problem.


.View attachment 26507
Stainless threads are just hard to make seal. Use Teflon tape with pipe dope over the tape. Also, you can unscrew the red cap from the CSV1A and you maybe able to spin it in place.
 

Valveman

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I have a hydrant at the well, wouldn’t the hydrant work as normal?
You probably have a 7 GPM series pump, which will do 9-10 GPM from that depth. You can use the hydrant before the CSV as long as you are using 10 GPM. But the CSV installed at the tank will not be able to control that hydrant, so if you use any less than 10 GPM the pump will cycle on and off repeatedly. We make the CSV125 and the CSVS125 to put in the well, so the hydrant would be controlled as well if you like.
 

sarg

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Sir .... A very timely response because I'm currently in process of the repair .... And I'll show the wife your statement that the stainless threads are "difficult" to seal ..... I told her the same observation but you know how that goes .... " He screwed up again".
I was able to get the CSV off with the cap in place.
Many thanks.
 

Valveman

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Stainless threads are just so stiff they do not flex to seal like good old brass, copper, plastic, etc. Everybody has problems with SS threads leaking. You can thank your government for that one. There was never anything wrong with the good old brass we used for a hundred plus years. Yet they made us take the little bit if lead out needed to make brass what it is. Just easier for manufacturers to switch to SS for "regulation purposes", as the unleaded brass stuff just turns green like the Statue of Liberty and flakes away. People been drinking from solid lead pipes for thousands of years with no problem until someone in our government decided it was bad for us. :mad:
 

sarg

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So here we go ......... after about an hour I now have seepage at the supplied 3/4 plastic fitting on the bottom. I used the white teflon on that fitting and it is now leaking........ which dictates I dump all the water again and try once more.
Went through the process & this time used the heavier Megatape ..... Now the wait & see begins.
 
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Valveman

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Plastic to Stainless should not be that hard to seal. Try just tightening it some before removing and adding more Teflon and dope.
 

sarg

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So ............ I think I can call the replacement scenario a success. No leaks and the CSV seems to hold the flow at 43 psi.
Two interesting details ....... the old water heater had a leaky 3/4 inlet nipple at it's base and the bottom of the tank was rusted through in a couple places. When I removed the fiberglass tank I noted there was water inside sloshing around .... so the bladder definitely had a leak. 14 years was a good amount of time and we got our money's worth ....... Very happy that our water system is "refreshed".
Now I just have to plan on a pump replacement because the check valve at the pump is loosing pressure and the system cycles about every hour.
Many thanks to Mr. Austin ( AKA Valveman ) for his guidance. Kind of amazing to be 7 decades into the journey and recognizing all the things "you don't know".
 
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