grey water ejector in basement funny smell

Discussion in 'Pumps and Wells' started by cernigs23, Aug 1, 2013.

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  1. Aug 1, 2013 #1

    cernigs23

    cernigs23

    cernigs23

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    I have a water ejector in my basement that takes water from the washer and utility sink. Im getting a funny smell and pretty sure its not sewer gas but something similar. The smell seems to be coming from the tank area. I siliconed the lid but hasn't fixed the problem. the tank is made of fiberglass. the tank seems to have some rust colored residue on the outside in some places. im assuming this is from moisture because the tank isn't air tight anymore. Any advice on what to do next. I tried installing a check valve but found out there was water in the ejector tube at all times. That made me think theres a check valve on the pump itself. My original thought that sewer gas was coming through the ejector pipe into the holding tank and coming through the lid. once I found water in the ejector pipe it didn't make sense that gas could travel from the 6" main line down to the tank. I have pics to better explain. Thanks

    IMG_20130801_153838_898.jpg

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  2. Aug 1, 2013 #2

    johnjh2o

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    Is that a tee down near the tank in the tank vent? If so where is it going?
     
  3. Aug 2, 2013 #3

    cernigs23

    cernigs23

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    Yes it is. It runs to a pipe sticking 4 inches out of the ground underneath the utility sink. I'm thinking the pipe runs to the ejector pit in the pretense of a bath installation in the future and the vent needs to be connected to it unless plugged. Now that's what I see... I'm not a plumber. I'm a former marine and now a firefighter. I have experience with rough carpentry and that's that. Thanks for looking.
     
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  4. Aug 2, 2013 #4

    cernigs23

    cernigs23

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    I'm sorry the tee you're referring to is where the utility sink empties into the tank
     
  5. Aug 2, 2013 #5

    johnjh2o

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    How about a picture of what you have on the other side of the wall.
     
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  6. Aug 2, 2013 #6

    LiQuId

    LiQuId

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    johns got ya covered but i do feel the need to mention that you would be better off without the furnco's ( rubber joints ) and instead solid glued joints.
    perhaps a union IF you need to access the pipe. ferncos are not pressure rated beyond 5 psi and your pump will generate much more than that ( likely ) which could potenmtially be a smell problem if the ferncos are buldgeing and allowing a small bit of seepage over time.

    more pics frm multiple angles and places would help. :)
     
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  7. Aug 3, 2013 #7

    cernigs23

    cernigs23

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    heres a pic of the other side of the wall. I hear ya on the rubber joints. there was a check valve there. im concerned that the pressure might be getting passed the lid on the tank. Cant be sure though. I siliconed the **** out of it.

    IMG_20130801_214503_383.jpg

    IMG_20130801_214516_856.jpg
     
  8. Aug 3, 2013 #8

    cernigs23

    cernigs23

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    here are some more pictures

    IMG_20130802_193832_127.jpg

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    IMG_20130802_194018_836.jpg
     
  9. Aug 3, 2013 #9

    johnjh2o

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    I may be wrong but it looks like the line you're using to vent the sewer ejector is a waste line from a fixture on the floor above.
     
  10. Aug 3, 2013 #10

    IFIXH20

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    The system is not setup 100 percent correct. The piping coming out the top should be for discharge and venting only, the waste inlet to the system is underground ( waste should enter through the side of the pit). The laundry tray/laundry sink is draining into the vent port of the system. I think the system is pipe this way-- The waste inlet is being used as a vent (meaning the cast iron under the sink is attach to the pit waste inlet).The pvc pipe tied to the cast iron pipe coming out the floor is a vent that has been ran above the cinder block to the exterior of the house or quick vent. The vent port of the pit is being used as the laundry waste inlet then revent to the vent. The discharge is what it is. I'm just assuming this is the configuration looking at the pics and not being there.:D
     
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  11. Aug 3, 2013 #11

    Zanne

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    Am I the only one noticing that the pipe with the rubber fitting doesn't appear to be very straight and has a curve to it after after the rubber part (almost as if its just not in straight)? It's like it isn't set in properly or something. Could it be from pressure pushing it apart slightly a bit of an angle (or just from not being put in straight to begin with).

    Would that be a problem? Or is it just an aesthetic thing? Because it just looks wrong to me for some reason. (But I'm not a plumber, nor do I play one on TV).
     
  12. Aug 8, 2013 #12

    LiQuId

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    IT shouldnt be there as these are not rated for pressure. also The check valve is an important part of the system and should be in place.
     
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